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Title: Design of new schools and other large buildings which are radon resistant and easy to mitigate. Report for September 1990-August 1991

Abstract

The paper discusses the recent incorporation of radon mitigation design recommendations in the construction of a hospital in Johnson City, TN. The recommendations resulted in the mitigation of a 5,500 square meter building with only one suction point at an incremental cost of $1.03 per square meter. Extrapolation of the pressure field extension (PFE) measurements indicates that a much larger building could have been mitigated with the system used. A search is underway for larger buildings to be built in radon prone areas of the U.S. in order to determine the effectiveness of the mitigation system in reducing radon in even larger buildings. As a prelude to the preparation of a new construction technical guidance document for schools, architectural drawings of all schools research by EPA, to date, were carefully studied to determine which building characteristics affect radon entry and ease of mitigation. Results of the study were presented at an international symposium on radon in Philadelphia, PA, in April 1991.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air and Energy Engineering Research Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
6865682
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6865682
Report Number(s):
PB-93-131662/XAB; EPA--600/A-92/272
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: See also PB--91-233254 and PB--92-121268
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; BUILDINGS; DESIGN; RADON; MITIGATION; POLLUTION CONTROL; ARCHITECTURE; BUILDING CODES; CONSTRUCTION; COST ESTIMATION; EXTRAPOLATION; HOSPITALS; LEADING ABSTRACT; NATIONAL GOVERNMENT; RECOMMENDATIONS; REGULATORY GUIDES; SCHOOL BUILDINGS; ABSTRACTS; CONTROL; DOCUMENT TYPES; EDUCATIONAL FACILITIES; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; GASES; MEDICAL ESTABLISHMENTS; NONMETALS; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; RARE GASES 290201* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics-- (1992-); 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety; 320107 -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Building Systems-- (1987-)

Citation Formats

Craig, A.B., Leovic, K.W., and Harris, D.B. Design of new schools and other large buildings which are radon resistant and easy to mitigate. Report for September 1990-August 1991. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Craig, A.B., Leovic, K.W., & Harris, D.B. Design of new schools and other large buildings which are radon resistant and easy to mitigate. Report for September 1990-August 1991. United States.
Craig, A.B., Leovic, K.W., and Harris, D.B. Wed . "Design of new schools and other large buildings which are radon resistant and easy to mitigate. Report for September 1990-August 1991". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6865682,
title = {Design of new schools and other large buildings which are radon resistant and easy to mitigate. Report for September 1990-August 1991},
author = {Craig, A.B. and Leovic, K.W. and Harris, D.B.},
abstractNote = {The paper discusses the recent incorporation of radon mitigation design recommendations in the construction of a hospital in Johnson City, TN. The recommendations resulted in the mitigation of a 5,500 square meter building with only one suction point at an incremental cost of $1.03 per square meter. Extrapolation of the pressure field extension (PFE) measurements indicates that a much larger building could have been mitigated with the system used. A search is underway for larger buildings to be built in radon prone areas of the U.S. in order to determine the effectiveness of the mitigation system in reducing radon in even larger buildings. As a prelude to the preparation of a new construction technical guidance document for schools, architectural drawings of all schools research by EPA, to date, were carefully studied to determine which building characteristics affect radon entry and ease of mitigation. Results of the study were presented at an international symposium on radon in Philadelphia, PA, in April 1991.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Technical Report:
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  • The paper discusses radon prevention in the design and construction of schools and other large buildings. The U.S. EPA's Office of Research and Development (ORD) has started incorporating radon control measures into the design and construction of new schools and other large buildings. The goal of the new designs is twofold: (1) to prevent elevated radon levels in the completed building, and (2) to provide the protection at a fraction of the cost of retrofit systems. ORD's Air and Energy Engineering Research Laboratory (AEERL) has conducted the research necessary to develop viable designs. The Indoor Radon Abatement Act of 1988more » set a national long-term goal for indoor radon of 0.5 picocurie per liter (pCi/L)--the same as that typically found in outdoor air. The EPA currently recommends that homeowners take action to reduce radon levels to below 4 pCi/L. To achieve the national goal set in the 1988 Act for new construction in radon-prone areas, AEERL research is using a combination of active subslab depressurization (ASD) and operation of the heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system to pressurize buildings. These measures are described briefly, along with a case history of one building.« less
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  • The paper discusses EPA's experiences using pressure field extension (PFE) to design active subslab depressurization (ASD) systems to reduce radon levels in old and new schools, including instances where the data collected resulted in the installation of smaller systems than expected and selection of high vacuum fans instead of 'normal' mitigation fans. A central collection system for use under very large slabs is discussed and PFE data are given for a hospital under construction. The most direct method of projecting or measuring the performance of an ASD system is to measure the strength and extent of the pressure field establishedmore » under the slab. The PFE can be determined (during diagnostics) to help design an ASD system and (following installation) to ascertain system performance. In schools and other large buildings, these data are invaluable to provide a system that will mitigate the building without undue cost escalation.« less