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Title: Innovative energy design for the '90s

Abstract

Demand in the 90's for energy in less developed countries may rise precipitously as these nations strive to increase their living standards. Without remedial measures, global average temperature has been estimated to rise 1[degree]C above its present level by the year 2025 and approximately 3[degree]C by the end of the next century and could severely disrupt agriculture, natural ecosystems and human settlements. By introducing innovative energy conservation and production methods and working hand-in-hand with our nations policy planners to provide meaningful incentives, emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depletion rates should diminish significantly in the long term. Industrial advantage for manufactured products in the 21st Century may well depend upon adoption of innovative, energy-conserving design strategies. Unless we are able to address the true economic cost of worldwide ecological and environmental degradation significant reductions in fuel consumption, global warming and ozone depletion may not result. In short, the challenge for energy engineers and managers in the 90's and beyond is without precedent. With world population now predicted to double in the next 40 years requiring a five-fold increase in industrial output, without sizable reductions in per capita energy use, sustainable development may not be possible.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6863683
Resource Type:
Book
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 14 SOLAR ENERGY; BUILDINGS; ENERGY EFFICIENCY; COOLING SYSTEMS; DESIGN; HEATING SYSTEMS; AIR SOURCE HEAT PUMPS; DAYLIGHTING; ENERGY STORAGE; GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMPS; HEAT PIPES; HEAT PUMPS; HVAC SYSTEMS; LEADING ABSTRACT; OPTIMIZATION; PHOTOVOLTAIC POWER SUPPLIES; SOLAR HEATING SYSTEMS; SOLAR-ASSISTED HEAT PUMPS; WATER SOURCE HEAT PUMPS; ABSTRACTS; AC SYSTEMS; AIR CONDITIONERS; DOCUMENT TYPES; EFFICIENCY; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; EQUIPMENT; POWER SUPPLIES; POWER SYSTEMS; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; SOLAR AIR CONDITIONERS; SOLAR COOLING SYSTEMS; SOLAR EQUIPMENT; STORAGE; 320105* - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Services- (1987-); 320107 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Systems- (1987-); 320106 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Building Equipment- (1987-); 140600 - Solar Energy- Photovoltaic Power Systems

Citation Formats

Meckler, M. Innovative energy design for the '90s. United States: N. p., 1993. Web.
Meckler, M. Innovative energy design for the '90s. United States.
Meckler, M. Fri . "Innovative energy design for the '90s". United States.
@article{osti_6863683,
title = {Innovative energy design for the '90s},
author = {Meckler, M},
abstractNote = {Demand in the 90's for energy in less developed countries may rise precipitously as these nations strive to increase their living standards. Without remedial measures, global average temperature has been estimated to rise 1[degree]C above its present level by the year 2025 and approximately 3[degree]C by the end of the next century and could severely disrupt agriculture, natural ecosystems and human settlements. By introducing innovative energy conservation and production methods and working hand-in-hand with our nations policy planners to provide meaningful incentives, emissions of greenhouse gases and ozone depletion rates should diminish significantly in the long term. Industrial advantage for manufactured products in the 21st Century may well depend upon adoption of innovative, energy-conserving design strategies. Unless we are able to address the true economic cost of worldwide ecological and environmental degradation significant reductions in fuel consumption, global warming and ozone depletion may not result. In short, the challenge for energy engineers and managers in the 90's and beyond is without precedent. With world population now predicted to double in the next 40 years requiring a five-fold increase in industrial output, without sizable reductions in per capita energy use, sustainable development may not be possible.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6863683}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1993},
month = {1}
}

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