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Title: Theory of interpretive architectures: ideal language machines. Technical report No. 170

Abstract

A study in ideal computer architectures or program representations is presented. An ideal architecture can be defined with respect to the representation that was used to describe a program originally, i.e., the higher-level language. Traditional machine architectures name operations and objects presumed to be present in the host machine: a memory space of certain size, ALU operations, etc. An ideal machine framed about a specific higher-level language assumes operations present in that language, and uses these operations to describe relationships between objects described in the source representation. The notion of ideal is carefully constrained. The object program representation must be easily decompilable (i.e. the source is readily reconstructable). It is simply assumed that the source itself is a good representation for the original problem; thus, any nonassignment operation present in the source program statement will appear as a single instruction (operation) in the ideal representation. All named objects are defined with respect to the natural scope of definition of the source program. For simplicity of discussion, statistical behavior of the program or the language is assumed to be unknown; i.e. Huffman codes are not used. A canonic interpretive form (CIF) or measure of a higher-level language program is developed. CIFmore » measures both static space to represent the program and dynamic time measurements of the number of instructions to be interpreted and the number of memory references these instructions will require. The CIF or ideal program representation is then compared by use of the Whetstone benchmark in its characteristics to several contemporary architectural approaches: IBM 370, Honeywell Level 66, Burroughs S-Language FORTRAN and DELtran, a quasi-ideal FORTRAN architecture based on CIF principles. 7 figures, 10 tables.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Stanford Univ., CA (USA). Computer Systems Lab.
OSTI Identifier:
6861139
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6861139
Report Number(s):
SU-326-P.39-31; SU-SEL-79-011
DOE Contract Number:  
AT03-76ER70039
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; COMPUTERS; DESIGN; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; PROGRAMMING; PROGRAMMING LANGUAGES 990200* -- Mathematics & Computers

Citation Formats

Flynn, M.J., and Hoevel, L.W. Theory of interpretive architectures: ideal language machines. Technical report No. 170. United States: N. p., 1979. Web.
Flynn, M.J., & Hoevel, L.W. Theory of interpretive architectures: ideal language machines. Technical report No. 170. United States.
Flynn, M.J., and Hoevel, L.W. Thu . "Theory of interpretive architectures: ideal language machines. Technical report No. 170". United States.
@article{osti_6861139,
title = {Theory of interpretive architectures: ideal language machines. Technical report No. 170},
author = {Flynn, M.J. and Hoevel, L.W.},
abstractNote = {A study in ideal computer architectures or program representations is presented. An ideal architecture can be defined with respect to the representation that was used to describe a program originally, i.e., the higher-level language. Traditional machine architectures name operations and objects presumed to be present in the host machine: a memory space of certain size, ALU operations, etc. An ideal machine framed about a specific higher-level language assumes operations present in that language, and uses these operations to describe relationships between objects described in the source representation. The notion of ideal is carefully constrained. The object program representation must be easily decompilable (i.e. the source is readily reconstructable). It is simply assumed that the source itself is a good representation for the original problem; thus, any nonassignment operation present in the source program statement will appear as a single instruction (operation) in the ideal representation. All named objects are defined with respect to the natural scope of definition of the source program. For simplicity of discussion, statistical behavior of the program or the language is assumed to be unknown; i.e. Huffman codes are not used. A canonic interpretive form (CIF) or measure of a higher-level language program is developed. CIF measures both static space to represent the program and dynamic time measurements of the number of instructions to be interpreted and the number of memory references these instructions will require. The CIF or ideal program representation is then compared by use of the Whetstone benchmark in its characteristics to several contemporary architectural approaches: IBM 370, Honeywell Level 66, Burroughs S-Language FORTRAN and DELtran, a quasi-ideal FORTRAN architecture based on CIF principles. 7 figures, 10 tables.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}

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