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Title: Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD

Abstract

The test method of activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD was critically carried out and compared with other test methods. Investigation of test conditions showed that the moderate deviation from the test conditions defined by the OECD Test Guidelines did not have much effect on the result, and some modifications were proposed to improve the method. This method had a poor detection limit compared with the LC50 test with Oryzias latipes and EC50 of the growth inhibition test with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The susceptivity of the method was particularly poor for the chemicals which were highly toxic in the other two tests.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Gifu College of Medical Technology, Japan
OSTI Identifier:
6857098
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf.; (United States); Journal Volume: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; TETRAHYMENA; RESPIRATION; XENOBIOTICS; TOXICITY; INHIBITION; SEWAGE SLUDGE; WATER POLLUTION; ANIMALS; CILIATA; INVERTEBRATES; MICROORGANISMS; POLLUTION; PROTOZOA; SEWAGE; SLUDGES; WASTES 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Yoshioka, Y., Nagase, H., Ose, Y., and Sato, T. Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD. United States: N. p., 1986. Web. doi:10.1016/0147-6513(86)90012-6.
Yoshioka, Y., Nagase, H., Ose, Y., & Sato, T. Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD. United States. doi:10.1016/0147-6513(86)90012-6.
Yoshioka, Y., Nagase, H., Ose, Y., and Sato, T. 1986. "Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD". United States. doi:10.1016/0147-6513(86)90012-6.
@article{osti_6857098,
title = {Evaluation of the test method activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD},
author = {Yoshioka, Y. and Nagase, H. and Ose, Y. and Sato, T.},
abstractNote = {The test method of activated sludge, respiration inhibition test proposed by the OECD was critically carried out and compared with other test methods. Investigation of test conditions showed that the moderate deviation from the test conditions defined by the OECD Test Guidelines did not have much effect on the result, and some modifications were proposed to improve the method. This method had a poor detection limit compared with the LC50 test with Oryzias latipes and EC50 of the growth inhibition test with Tetrahymena pyriformis. The susceptivity of the method was particularly poor for the chemicals which were highly toxic in the other two tests.},
doi = {10.1016/0147-6513(86)90012-6},
journal = {Ecotoxicol. Environ. Saf.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month =
}
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