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Title: The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming

Abstract

Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diageneticmore » history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. (Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge, LA (United States))
  2. (Louisiana Land and Exploration, Denver, CO (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6855354
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6855354
Report Number(s):
CONF-960527--
Journal ID: ISSN 0149-1423; CODEN: AABUD2
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: AAPG Bulletin; Journal Volume: 5; Conference: Annual convention of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, Inc. and the Society for Sedimentary Geology: global exploration and geotechnology, San Diego, CA (United States), 19-22 May 1996
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; NATURAL GAS; EXPLORATION; PRODUCTION; RESERVOIR ROCK; GEOLOGIC MODELS; WYOMING; NATURAL GAS FIELDS; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; STRATIGRAPHY; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FOSSIL FUELS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGY; MINERAL RESOURCES; NATURAL GAS DEPOSITS; NORTH AMERICA; RESOURCES; USA 030200* -- Natural Gas-- Reserves, Geology, & Exploration

Citation Formats

Moore, C.H., and Hawkins, C. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming. United States: N. p., 1996. Web.
Moore, C.H., & Hawkins, C. The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming. United States.
Moore, C.H., and Hawkins, C. Mon . "The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6855354,
title = {The deep Madden Field, a super-deep Madison gas reservoir, Wind River Basin, Wyoming},
author = {Moore, C.H. and Hawkins, C.},
abstractNote = {Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logs at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.},
doi = {},
journal = {AAPG Bulletin},
number = ,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996},
month = {Mon Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1996}
}

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  • Madison dolomites form the reservoir of a super deep, potential giant sour gas field developed on the Madden Anticline immediately in front of the Owl Creek Thrust along the northern rim of the Wind River Basin, central Wyoming. The Madison reservoir dolomites are presently buried to some 25,000 feet at Madden Field and exhibit porosity in excess of 15%. An equivalent dolomitized Madison sequence is exposed in outcrop only 5 miles to the north on the hanging wall of the Owl Creek thrust at Lysite Mountain. Preliminary comparative stratigraphic, geochemical and petrologic data, between outcrop and available cores and logsmore » at Deep Madden suggests: (1) early, sea level-controlled, evaporite-related dolomitization of the reservoir and outcrop prior to significant burial; (2) both outcrop and deep reservoir dolomites underwent significant recrystallization during a common burial history until their connection was severed during Laramide faulting in the Eocene; (3) While the dolomite reservoir at Madden suffered additional diagenesis during an additional 7-10 thousand feet of burial, the pore systems between outcrop and deep reservoir are remarkably similar. The two existing deep Madison wells at Madden are on stream, with a third deep Madison well currently drilling. The sequence stratigraphic framework and the diagenetic history of the Madison strongly suggests that outcrops and surface cores of the Madison in the Owl Creek Mountains will be useful in further development and detailed reservoir modeling of the Madden Deep Field.« less
  • Second-generation computer models of thermal maturation of coal and carbonaceous rock indicate that active gas generation markedly decreases with moderate temperature decrease. These models predict that the overpressured gas reservoirs of the Madden Anticline cannot be maintained by ongoing active generation. This paper proposes natural desorption of gas from exhumed coal and carbonaceous rock as one cause of continued overpressuring after significant cooling in eroding basins.
  • The Madden Deep unit, located in the Wind River basin of central Wyoming, has been a source of natural gas production from Upper Cretaceous and Lower Tertiary formations. Drilling in excess of 24,000 ft occurred during the mid-1980s and early 1990s to explore for and develop Paleozoic gas potential. These well bores penetrated the Upper Cretaceous Frontier Formation at depths below 20,000 ft. Open-hole logs, cores, and drilling cuttings suggest a significant gas accumulation within the Frontier. The Frontier Formation represents a series of coarsening-upward, shallow-marine sequences deposited as a seaward-stepping system along the Western Cretaceous Seaway margin. In Maddenmore » field, the fifth bench of the Frontier contains traditional facies from foreshore/beach, to upper and lower shoreface, to offshore regimes. Common to deposites elsewhere, the best reservoirs are found in the foreshore/beach settings at the top of the bench. Production is not related to easily understood porosity regimes; primary intergranular porosity is virtually nonexistent. An overpressured reservoir with numerous vertical/subvertical fractures accounts for production. Microfractures and megafractures, up to 10 mm across, provide permeabilities that exceed 1 d. Fractures are partly filled by abundant quartz and minor calcite. Mineralization would allow singificant reservoir pressure drawdown without reducing aperture width. Major fractures apparently strike west-northwest, and such orientation data may permit a horizontal drilling venture when technology is capable of surviving such deep, overpressured, and high-temperature environments.« less
  • {open_quotes}Weathered-layer{close_quotes} corrections to seismic-reflection travel times for deep hydrocarbon exploration are often made using shallow refracted arrivals on the reflection records. There has been recent interest in using these {open_quotes}refraction-statics{close_quotes} solutions to provide depth-to-bedrock maps for environmental or engineering applications as a by-product of the deep seismic survey. We show that the depth to bedrock and bedrock velocities produced by automatic refraction-statics processing of a three-dimensional seismic survey of a gas field in Wyoming differ significantly from those determined from an engineering survey. Manual reprocessing of the refraction statics produced some improvement, but is still inferior to refraction data takenmore » for the specific purpose of determining depth to bedrock. Automatic refraction statics provide adequate travel-time adjustments to reflection records due to a shallow low-velocity layer, but such solutions should not be taken to represent explicit depth to bedrock.« less
  • Desorbed gas volume from coal core when corrected for lost gas and to standard conditions (STP) indicates a total coal-bed methane (CBM) content of about 2 cc/g (100 scf/ton) in the Cretaceous Mesaverde Formation from depths of 470 to 590 ft in the southeast quarter of Sec. 32, T2S, R2E, northwest of Hudson, Wyoming. The desorbed gas is 97.3 - 99.7% methane with {delta}{sup 13}C{sub 1} signatures of {minus}47 to {minus}53{per thousand}, suggesting a degraded biogenic gas or a mixture of biogenic and thermogenic gas. in this area, the total thickness of coal beds ranges up to 30 ft withmore » a vitrinite relectance (R{sub m}) of about 0.5%. These coals (considering only individual beds over 2 ft thick) thicken to a total of about 10 ft at approximately 3,500 ft depth in the Riverton Dome area some 12 mi east of Hudson. Cores taken in other shallow (< 1,000 ft deep) coals in the Mesaverde and Meeteetse Formations near Alkali Butte and near Uelton mine, contained no significant gas. The water table at these sites is near surface; so natural desorption is apparently not now occurring, but sometime in the past such an event possibly depleted the CBM. Even though these two wells did not yield gas, the gas find near Hudson is significant; it suggests that more deeply buried coals should have good CBM potiential because of the additional potential for preservation and because the content of thermogenic methane increases with depth and Rm. The shallow coals around the southwest edge of the basin are marginally mature with an Rm of 0.4-0.5%, which indicates that gas, if present, will be early biogenic gas that must have been preserved during burial and water table fluctuations.« less