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Title: Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries

Abstract

Radionuclide techniques serve an important role in evaluating childhood injuries. Frequently, they can be employed as the initial and definitive examination. At times they represent the only modality that will detect specific injuries such as the skeletal system. Familiarity with the advantages and limitations of tracer techniques will insure appropriate management of childhood injuries.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6850137
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Semin. Nucl. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 13:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CHILDREN; RADIOISOTOPE SCANNING; INJURIES; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; AGE GROUPS; COUNTING TECHNIQUES 550601* -- Medicine-- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics

Citation Formats

Sty, J.R., Starshak, R.J., and Hubbard, A.M. Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries. United States: N. p., 1983. Web. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(83)80020-8.
Sty, J.R., Starshak, R.J., & Hubbard, A.M. Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries. United States. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(83)80020-8.
Sty, J.R., Starshak, R.J., and Hubbard, A.M. 1983. "Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries". United States. doi:10.1016/S0001-2998(83)80020-8.
@article{osti_6850137,
title = {Radionuclide evaluation in childhood injuries},
author = {Sty, J.R. and Starshak, R.J. and Hubbard, A.M.},
abstractNote = {Radionuclide techniques serve an important role in evaluating childhood injuries. Frequently, they can be employed as the initial and definitive examination. At times they represent the only modality that will detect specific injuries such as the skeletal system. Familiarity with the advantages and limitations of tracer techniques will insure appropriate management of childhood injuries.},
doi = {10.1016/S0001-2998(83)80020-8},
journal = {Semin. Nucl. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 13:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1983,
month = 7
}
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