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Title: Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations

Abstract

The peak-counts model has several advantages, but its use may be limited due to the condition that the venous egress may not be negligible at the time of peak-counts. Consequently, blood flow measurements by the peak-counts model will depend on the bolus size, bolus duration, and the minimum transit time of the bolus through the region of interest. The effect of bolus size on the measurement of extraction fraction and blood flow was evaluated by injecting 1 to 30ml of rubidium chloride in the femoral vein of a dog and measuring the myocardial activity with a beta probe over the heart. Regional blood flow measurements were not found to vary with bolus sizes up to 30ml. The effect of bolus duration was studied by injecting a 10cc bolus of tracer at different speeds in the femoral vein of a dog. All intravenous injections undergo a broadening of the bolus duration due to the transit time of the tracer through the lungs and the heart. This transit time was found to range from 4-6 second FWHM and dominates the duration of the bolus to the myocardium for up to 3 second injections. A computer simulation has been carried out in whichmore » the different parameters of delay time, extraction fraction, and bolus duration can be changed to assess the errors in the peak-counts model. The results of the simulations show that the error will be greatest for short transit time delays and for low extraction fractions.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, Houston, TX
OSTI Identifier:
6844834
Report Number(s):
CONF-840619-
Journal ID: CODEN: JNMEA; TRN: 87-008778
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Nucl. Med.; (United States); Journal Volume: 25:5; Conference: 31. annual meeting of the Society of Nuclear Medicine, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 5 Jun 1984
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; BLOOD FLOW; FLOW MODELS; BLOOD COUNT; EXTRACTION; LUNGS; MYOCARDIUM; RUBIDIUM CHLORIDES; TIME DEPENDENCE; TRACER TECHNIQUES; ALKALI METAL COMPOUNDS; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; CHLORIDES; CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; HEART; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MUSCLES; ORGANS; RESPIRATORY SYSTEM; RUBIDIUM COMPOUNDS; SEPARATION PROCESSES 550601* -- Medicine-- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics; 551001 -- Physiological Systems-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Mullani, N.A., Marani, S.K., Ekas, R.D., and Gould, K.L. Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations. United States: N. p., 1984. Web.
Mullani, N.A., Marani, S.K., Ekas, R.D., & Gould, K.L. Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations. United States.
Mullani, N.A., Marani, S.K., Ekas, R.D., and Gould, K.L. 1984. "Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6844834,
title = {Peak-counts blood flow model-errors and limitations},
author = {Mullani, N.A. and Marani, S.K. and Ekas, R.D. and Gould, K.L.},
abstractNote = {The peak-counts model has several advantages, but its use may be limited due to the condition that the venous egress may not be negligible at the time of peak-counts. Consequently, blood flow measurements by the peak-counts model will depend on the bolus size, bolus duration, and the minimum transit time of the bolus through the region of interest. The effect of bolus size on the measurement of extraction fraction and blood flow was evaluated by injecting 1 to 30ml of rubidium chloride in the femoral vein of a dog and measuring the myocardial activity with a beta probe over the heart. Regional blood flow measurements were not found to vary with bolus sizes up to 30ml. The effect of bolus duration was studied by injecting a 10cc bolus of tracer at different speeds in the femoral vein of a dog. All intravenous injections undergo a broadening of the bolus duration due to the transit time of the tracer through the lungs and the heart. This transit time was found to range from 4-6 second FWHM and dominates the duration of the bolus to the myocardium for up to 3 second injections. A computer simulation has been carried out in which the different parameters of delay time, extraction fraction, and bolus duration can be changed to assess the errors in the peak-counts model. The results of the simulations show that the error will be greatest for short transit time delays and for low extraction fractions.},
doi = {},
journal = {J. Nucl. Med.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 25:5,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 1
}

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