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Title: Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine

Abstract

For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based onmore » the best current biokinetic data available.« less

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge Associated Universities, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
684477
Report Number(s):
ORISE-99-0164-Vol.2; CONF-960536-PROC.-Vol.2
ON: DE99002904; TRN: IM9943%%168
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 6. international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium, Gatlinburg, TN (United States), 7-10 May 1996; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1999; Related Information: Is Part Of Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2; S.-Stelson, A.T. [ed.] [comp.]; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B. [eds.]; Smith, F.B. [comp.]; PB: 401 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; DOSIMETRY; NUCLEAR MEDICINE; RADIATION DOSES; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; DOSE EQUIVALENTS; M CODES; ICRP

Citation Formats

Toohey, R.E., and Stabin, M.G.. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Toohey, R.E., & Stabin, M.G.. Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine. United States.
Toohey, R.E., and Stabin, M.G.. Fri . "Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/684477.
@article{osti_684477,
title = {Comparative analysis of dosimetry parameters for nuclear medicine},
author = {Toohey, R.E. and Stabin, M.G.},
abstractNote = {For years many have employed the concept of ``total-body dose`` or ``whole-body dose,`` i.e., the total energy deposited in the body divided by the mass of the body, when evaluating the risks of different nuclear medicine procedures. The effective dose equivalent (H{sub E}), first described in ICRP Publication 26, has been accepted by some as a better quantity to use in evaluating the total risk of a procedure, but its use has been criticized by others primarily because the tissue weighting factors were intended for use in the radiation worker, rather than the nuclear medicine patient population. Nevertheless, in ICRP Publication 52, the ICRP has suggested that the H{sub E} may be used in nuclear medicine. The ICRP also has published a compendium of dose estimates, including H{sub E} values, for various nuclear medicine procedures at various ages in ICRP Publication 53. The effective dose (E) of ICRP Publication 60 is perhaps more suitable for use in nuclear medicine, with tissue weighting factors based on the entire population. Other comparisons of H{sub E} and E have been published. The authors have used the program MIRDOSE 3.1 to compute total-body dose, H{sub E}, and E for 62 radiopharmaceutical procedures, based on the best current biokinetic data available.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1999},
month = {Fri Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1999}
}

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  • The authors have previously developed a knowledge-based method of factor analysis to analyze dynamic nuclear medicine image sequences. In this paper, the authors analyze dynamic PET cerebral glucose metabolism and neuroreceptor binding studies. These methods have shown the ability to reduce the dimensionality of the data, enhance the image quality of the sequence, and generate meaningful functional images and their corresponding physiological time functions. The new information produced by the factor analysis has now been used to improve the estimation of various physiological parameters. A principal component analysis (PCA) is first performed to identify statistically significant temporal variations and removemore » the uncorrelated variations (noise) due to Poisson counting statistics. The statistically significant principal components are then used to reconstruct a noise-reduced image sequence as well as provide an initial solution for the factor analysis. Prior knowledge such as the compartmental models or the requirement of positivity and simple structure can be used to constrain the analysis. These constraints are used to rotate the factors to the most physically and physiologically realistic solution. The final result is a small number of time functions (factors) representing the underlying physiological processes and their associated weighting images representing the spatial localization of these functions. Estimation of physiological parameters can then be performed using the noise-reduced image sequence generated from the statistically significant PCs and/or the final factor images and time functions. These results are compared to the parameter estimation using standard methods and the original raw image sequences. Graphical analysis was performed at the pixel level to generate comparable parametric images of the slope and intercept (influx constant and distribution volume).« less
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