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Title: Creep behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam

Abstract

The results of creep tests on a closed-cell aluminum foam (Alporas) are reported. At low stresses and temperatures, the behavior is well described by existing models for foams. At high stresses and temperatures, the power law creep exponent increases from about 4 to 15 and the activation energy increases from about 100 to 450 kJ/mol. The increase in power law exponent may be related to damage; a finite element damage model of a two-dimensional honeycomb gives consistent results with the measured foam behavior.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  2. National Cheng Kung Univ., Tainan (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Civil Engineering
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
684393
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Acta Materialia
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 47; Journal Issue: 10; Other Information: PBD: 10 Aug 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; CREEP; ALUMINIUM; FOAMS; STRESSES; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; FINITE ELEMENT METHOD; DAMAGE

Citation Formats

Andrews, E.W., Gibson, L.J., and Huang, J.S. Creep behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam. United States: N. p., 1999. Web. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00161-5.
Andrews, E.W., Gibson, L.J., & Huang, J.S. Creep behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam. United States. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00161-5.
Andrews, E.W., Gibson, L.J., and Huang, J.S. Tue . "Creep behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam". United States. doi:10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00161-5.
@article{osti_684393,
title = {Creep behavior of a closed-cell aluminum foam},
author = {Andrews, E.W. and Gibson, L.J. and Huang, J.S.},
abstractNote = {The results of creep tests on a closed-cell aluminum foam (Alporas) are reported. At low stresses and temperatures, the behavior is well described by existing models for foams. At high stresses and temperatures, the power law creep exponent increases from about 4 to 15 and the activation energy increases from about 100 to 450 kJ/mol. The increase in power law exponent may be related to damage; a finite element damage model of a two-dimensional honeycomb gives consistent results with the measured foam behavior.},
doi = {10.1016/S1359-6454(99)00161-5},
journal = {Acta Materialia},
number = 10,
volume = 47,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {8}
}