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Title: Public health risk from ELF (electromagnetic fields) exposure -- can it be assessed

Abstract

Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) are a ubiquitous environmental agent. There are persistent indications that these fields have biologic activity, and consequently, there may be a deleterious component to their action. Epidemiologic researchers of ELF face several methodological obstacles, and quantitative risk assessment is in a quandary. Simply stated there is a need for more data---especially with regard to exposure assessment.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6840470
Report Number(s):
CONF-8805176-1
ON: DE88015277
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-84OR21400
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Meeting of the International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon, France, 2 May 1988
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; ELECTROMAGNETIC FIELDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; EPIDEMIOLOGY; PUBLIC HEALTH; HAZARDS 552000* -- Public Health

Citation Formats

Aldrich, T.E., and Easterly, C.E. Public health risk from ELF (electromagnetic fields) exposure -- can it be assessed. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Aldrich, T.E., & Easterly, C.E. Public health risk from ELF (electromagnetic fields) exposure -- can it be assessed. United States.
Aldrich, T.E., and Easterly, C.E. 1988. "Public health risk from ELF (electromagnetic fields) exposure -- can it be assessed". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6840470,
title = {Public health risk from ELF (electromagnetic fields) exposure -- can it be assessed},
author = {Aldrich, T.E. and Easterly, C.E.},
abstractNote = {Extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF) are a ubiquitous environmental agent. There are persistent indications that these fields have biologic activity, and consequently, there may be a deleterious component to their action. Epidemiologic researchers of ELF face several methodological obstacles, and quantitative risk assessment is in a quandary. Simply stated there is a need for more data---especially with regard to exposure assessment.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Conference:
Other availability
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