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Title: Development of a hot gas cleanup system

Abstract

Numerous studies have been performed comparing different approaches to integrating coal gasifiers with electric power production technologies such as gas turbines and molten carbonate fuel cells. Each of these studies concluded that, if the fuel from the gasifier could be cleaned at an elevated temperature, the cost of electricity from the plant could be significantly lowered. IGT has been exploring a process for removing sulfur-containing compounds from 1000/degree/ to 1200/degree/F coal-derived fuel gases. The process uses a mixture of metal oxide-containing sorbents that react with the sulfur-containing compounds. The metal oxide-containing sorbents currently being explored for the process are 1) a zinc oxide-on-zinc aluminate sorbent and 2) a cobalt titanate-on-titania sorbent. The two sorbents are segregated into separate beds. The sulfur-containing fuel gas first comes into contact with the cobalt titanate-containing sorbent where more than 67% of the sulfur is removed. The partially desulfurized fuel gas then comes into contact with the zinc oxide-containing sorbent where the sulfur content of the fuel gas is reduced to less than 20 ppM (v). The sulfur is recovered as elemental sulfur rather than SO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/S and there is no tail gas from the process. Regeneration of the mixture is performedmore » with pure O/sub 2/ and a recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/. The SO/sub 2/ from this reaction is then combined with the recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/ to regenerate the cobalt titanate-containing sorbent. The recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/ is required because this radiation is thermodynamically limited. The product gas contains both elemental sulfur and SO/sub 2/. The elemental sulfur is removed from the SO/sub 2/ by cooling and condensation and the SO/sub 2/ is recycled back to the cobalt titanate bed undergoing regeneration. IGT also began to develop a process for removing HCl and other trace contaminants from 1000/degree/ to 1200/degree/F fuel gases.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Institute of Gas Technology, Chicago, IL (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6818460
Report Number(s):
CONF-870659-8
ON: DE88017162
DOE Contract Number:  
AC21-85MC22144
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 7. annual gasification systems conference, Morgantown, WV, USA, 16 Jun 1987; Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; ADSORBENTS; REGENERATION; CARBON OXYSULFIDE; REMOVAL; FUEL GAS; HOT GAS CLEANUP; ECONOMICS; HYDROCHLORIC ACID; HYDROGEN SULFIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; COAL GASIFICATION; COBALT COMPOUNDS; DESULFURIZATION; RECOVERY; SULFUR; TITANATES; ZINC OXIDES; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; FLUIDS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GASIFICATION; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; INORGANIC ACIDS; NONMETALS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PURIFICATION; SULFIDES; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; TITANIUM COMPOUNDS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; ZINC COMPOUNDS; 010404* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Gasification

Citation Formats

Anderson, G L, and Berry, F O. Development of a hot gas cleanup system. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Anderson, G L, & Berry, F O. Development of a hot gas cleanup system. United States.
Anderson, G L, and Berry, F O. 1987. "Development of a hot gas cleanup system". United States.
@article{osti_6818460,
title = {Development of a hot gas cleanup system},
author = {Anderson, G L and Berry, F O},
abstractNote = {Numerous studies have been performed comparing different approaches to integrating coal gasifiers with electric power production technologies such as gas turbines and molten carbonate fuel cells. Each of these studies concluded that, if the fuel from the gasifier could be cleaned at an elevated temperature, the cost of electricity from the plant could be significantly lowered. IGT has been exploring a process for removing sulfur-containing compounds from 1000/degree/ to 1200/degree/F coal-derived fuel gases. The process uses a mixture of metal oxide-containing sorbents that react with the sulfur-containing compounds. The metal oxide-containing sorbents currently being explored for the process are 1) a zinc oxide-on-zinc aluminate sorbent and 2) a cobalt titanate-on-titania sorbent. The two sorbents are segregated into separate beds. The sulfur-containing fuel gas first comes into contact with the cobalt titanate-containing sorbent where more than 67% of the sulfur is removed. The partially desulfurized fuel gas then comes into contact with the zinc oxide-containing sorbent where the sulfur content of the fuel gas is reduced to less than 20 ppM (v). The sulfur is recovered as elemental sulfur rather than SO/sub 2/ or H/sub 2/S and there is no tail gas from the process. Regeneration of the mixture is performed with pure O/sub 2/ and a recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/. The SO/sub 2/ from this reaction is then combined with the recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/ to regenerate the cobalt titanate-containing sorbent. The recirculating stream of SO/sub 2/ is required because this radiation is thermodynamically limited. The product gas contains both elemental sulfur and SO/sub 2/. The elemental sulfur is removed from the SO/sub 2/ by cooling and condensation and the SO/sub 2/ is recycled back to the cobalt titanate bed undergoing regeneration. IGT also began to develop a process for removing HCl and other trace contaminants from 1000/degree/ to 1200/degree/F fuel gases.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6818460}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1987},
month = {1}
}

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