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Title: Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands

Abstract

Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6800142
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6800142; Legacy ID: DE87006316
Report Number(s):
LA-10865-MS
ON: DE87006316
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; ROOTS; MORPHOLOGY; CACTI; CEDARS; GRASS; LASL; LEGUMINOSAE; LILIUM; LOCUST TREES; OAKS; PINES; PISUM; SHRUBS; SUNFLOWERS; BACTERIA; CONIFERS; MICROORGANISMS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; PLANTS; RHIZOBIUM; TREES; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS 510100* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Basic Studies-- (-1989); 550800 -- Morphology; 140504 -- Solar Energy Conversion-- Biomass Production & Conversion-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Tierney, G.D., and Foxx, T.S. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Tierney, G.D., & Foxx, T.S. Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands. United States.
Tierney, G.D., and Foxx, T.S. Thu . "Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6800142,
title = {Root lengths of plants on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands},
author = {Tierney, G.D. and Foxx, T.S.},
abstractNote = {Maximum root lengths of 22 plant species occurring on Los Alamos National Laboratory lands were measured. An average of two longest roots from each species were dug up and their lengths, typical shapes, and qualitative morphologics were noted along with the overstory dimensions of the plant individual with which the roots were associated. Maximum root lengths were compared with overstory (height times width) dimensions. Among the life forms studied, the shrubs tend to show the longest roots in relation to overstory size. Forbs show the shortest roots in relation to overstory size. Measurements of tree roots suggest only that immature trees on the Pajarito Plateau may have root-length to overstory-size ratios near one. 30 refs., 14 figs., 2 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987},
month = {Thu Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1987}
}

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