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Title: Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions

Abstract

VOC emission profile is an important parameter to describe the building materials and consumer products for their impact on indoor air quality (IAQ). Emission profiles are dependent on the test conditions. It is therefore very important to standardize testing conditions in order to compare emission factors and decay constants reported by various testing laboratories. Standard chamber test conditions (Chamber temperature of 23 C, relative humidity of 50 %, air change rate of 1 ACH, and specimen loading ratio of 0.4 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) have been proposed for using small environment chamber (0.05 m{sup 3}) by an international consortium research program led by the Institute for Research in Construction, NRCC. VOC emissions (excluding formaldehyde) from three building materials, a particleboard, a carpet with rubber backing and a vinyl floor tile were measured under above defined test conditions. Samples of the chamber air were collected using multi-sorbent tubes during the chamber tests, and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) GC/FID. GC peaks were identified using TD/GC/MS. Major VOCs emitted were solvents, aldehydes, C10-and C15-terpenes for the particleboard, alkanes, alkenes and 4-phenyl cyclohexene for the carpet. VOC emissions from vinyl floor tile were dominated by a mixture of two alkyl propanoates, which eluted latemore » (at about 230 C) on GC column. Total VOCs in the chamber air reached at 1100, 210 and 2400 m g/m3 for the particleboard, carpet and vinyl floor tile respectively. The analytical variation was around 5 to 10 % judged by a number of duplicates analyzed during the tests. First order exponential decay model and power law decay model were used to describe the emission factor decay from 12 h after the start of dynamic chamber tests. The power law model was found to better fit the experimental data than the first order decay model.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. National Research Council, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Inst. for Research in Construction
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
679339
Report Number(s):
CONF-980632-
TRN: IM9940%%158
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 91. annual meeting and exhibition of the Air and Waste Management Association, San Diego, CA (United States), 14-18 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: 1998; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceedings of the 91. annual meeting and exhibition. Bridging international boundaries: Clean production for environmental stewardship; PB: [5000] p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; INDOOR AIR POLLUTION; BUILDING MATERIALS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; POLLUTION SOURCES; ORGANIC SOLVENTS; ALDEHYDES; TERPENES; ALKANES; ALKENES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Zhu, J., Zhang, J., Lusztyk, E., and Magee, R.J. Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Zhu, J., Zhang, J., Lusztyk, E., & Magee, R.J. Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions. United States.
Zhu, J., Zhang, J., Lusztyk, E., and Magee, R.J. 1998. "Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_679339,
title = {Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions},
author = {Zhu, J. and Zhang, J. and Lusztyk, E. and Magee, R.J.},
abstractNote = {VOC emission profile is an important parameter to describe the building materials and consumer products for their impact on indoor air quality (IAQ). Emission profiles are dependent on the test conditions. It is therefore very important to standardize testing conditions in order to compare emission factors and decay constants reported by various testing laboratories. Standard chamber test conditions (Chamber temperature of 23 C, relative humidity of 50 %, air change rate of 1 ACH, and specimen loading ratio of 0.4 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) have been proposed for using small environment chamber (0.05 m{sup 3}) by an international consortium research program led by the Institute for Research in Construction, NRCC. VOC emissions (excluding formaldehyde) from three building materials, a particleboard, a carpet with rubber backing and a vinyl floor tile were measured under above defined test conditions. Samples of the chamber air were collected using multi-sorbent tubes during the chamber tests, and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) GC/FID. GC peaks were identified using TD/GC/MS. Major VOCs emitted were solvents, aldehydes, C10-and C15-terpenes for the particleboard, alkanes, alkenes and 4-phenyl cyclohexene for the carpet. VOC emissions from vinyl floor tile were dominated by a mixture of two alkyl propanoates, which eluted late (at about 230 C) on GC column. Total VOCs in the chamber air reached at 1100, 210 and 2400 m g/m3 for the particleboard, carpet and vinyl floor tile respectively. The analytical variation was around 5 to 10 % judged by a number of duplicates analyzed during the tests. First order exponential decay model and power law decay model were used to describe the emission factor decay from 12 h after the start of dynamic chamber tests. The power law model was found to better fit the experimental data than the first order decay model.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1998,
month =
}

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