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Title: Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects

Abstract

Spiral waves, a type of reentrant excitation,'' are believed to be associated with the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Recent experimental findings have implicated defective regions as a means of trapping spirals which would otherwise drift and (eventually) disappear. Here, we model the myocardium as a simple excitable medium and study via simulation the interaction between a drifting spiral and one or more such defects. We interpret our results in terms of a criterion for the transition between trapped and untrapped drifting spirals.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2]
  1. (Department of Physics and Institute for Nonlinear Science, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States))
  2. (Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48105 (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6792211
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-92ER54189
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Physical Review E; (United States); Journal Volume: 47:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; MYOCARDIUM; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; EXCITATION; NONLINEAR PROBLEMS; TRAPPING; WAVE PROPAGATION; BODY; CARDIOVASCULAR SYSTEM; ENERGY-LEVEL TRANSITIONS; HEART; MUSCLES; ORGANS; SIMULATION 550600* -- Medicine

Citation Formats

Zou, X., Levine, H., and Kessler, D.A.. Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects. United States: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.47.R800.
Zou, X., Levine, H., & Kessler, D.A.. Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.47.R800.
Zou, X., Levine, H., and Kessler, D.A.. 1993. "Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.47.R800.
@article{osti_6792211,
title = {Interaction between a drifting spiral and defects},
author = {Zou, X. and Levine, H. and Kessler, D.A.},
abstractNote = {Spiral waves, a type of reentrant excitation,'' are believed to be associated with the most dangerous cardiac arrhythmias, including ventricular tachycardia and fibrillation. Recent experimental findings have implicated defective regions as a means of trapping spirals which would otherwise drift and (eventually) disappear. Here, we model the myocardium as a simple excitable medium and study via simulation the interaction between a drifting spiral and one or more such defects. We interpret our results in terms of a criterion for the transition between trapped and untrapped drifting spirals.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevE.47.R800},
journal = {Physical Review E; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 47:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1993,
month = 2
}
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