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Title: In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages

Abstract

In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commissionmore » on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.« less

Authors:
; ;  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. (CEA/DSV/DPTE/LRT, Bruyeres le Chatel (France))
  2. (CEA/IPSN/DRSN, Fontenay aux Roses (France))
  3. (CEA/DSV/DPTE, Fontenay aux Roses (France))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6790331
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6790331
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States); Journal Volume: 97
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MACROPHAGES; METABOLIC ACTIVATION; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; URANIUM OXIDES U3O8; DISSOLUTION; LUNG CLEARANCE; BABOONS; IMMOBILIZED CELLS; IN VITRO; PHAGOCYTOSIS; RADIATION PROTECTION; ACTINIDE COMPOUNDS; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMALS; CHALCOGENIDES; CLEARANCE; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; EXCRETION; MAMMALS; MONKEYS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHAGOCYTES; PRIMATES; SOMATIC CELLS; URANIUM COMPOUNDS; URANIUM OXIDES; VERTEBRATES 560150* -- Radiation Effects on Animals; 550200 -- Biochemistry

Citation Formats

Poncy, J.L., Dhilly, M., Verry, M., Metivier, H., and Masse, R. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages. United States: N. p., 1992. Web. doi:10.1289/ehp.9297127.
Poncy, J.L., Dhilly, M., Verry, M., Metivier, H., & Masse, R. In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages. United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.9297127.
Poncy, J.L., Dhilly, M., Verry, M., Metivier, H., and Masse, R. Wed . "In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages". United States. doi:10.1289/ehp.9297127.
@article{osti_6790331,
title = {In vitro dissolution of uranium oxide by baboon alveolar macrophages},
author = {Poncy, J.L. and Dhilly, M. and Verry, M. and Metivier, H. and Masse, R.},
abstractNote = {In vitro cellular dissolution tests for insoluble forms of uranium oxide are technically difficult with conventional methodology using adherent alveolar macrophages. The limited number of cells per flask and the slow dissolution rate in a large volume of nutritive medium are obvious restricting factors. macrophages in suspension cannot be substituted because they represent different and poorly reproducible functional subtypes with regard to activation and enzyme secretion. Preliminary results on the dissolution of uranium oxide using immobilized alveolar macrophages are promising because large numbers of highly function macrophages can be cultured in a limited volume. Cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavages performed on baboons (Papio papio) and then immobilized after the phagocytosis of uranium octoxide (U[sub 3]O[sub 8]) particles in alginate beads linked with Ca[sup 2+]. The dissolution rate expressed as percentage of initial uranium content in cells was 0.039 [+-] 0.016%/day for particles with a count median geometric diameter of 3.84 [mu]m([sigma][sub g] = 1.84). A 2-fold increase in the dissolution rate was observed when the same number of particles was immobilized without macrophages. These results, obtained in vitro, suggest that the U[sub 3]O[sub g] preparation investigated should be assigned to inhalation class Y as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Future experiments are intended to clarify this preliminary work and to examine the dissolution characteristics of other particles such as uranium dioxide. It is recommended that the dissolution rate should be measured over an interval of 3 weeks, which is compatible with the survival time of immobilized cells in culture and may reveal transformation states occurring with aging of the particles. 23 refs., 3 figs.},
doi = {10.1289/ehp.9297127},
journal = {Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 97,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1992},
month = {Wed Jul 01 00:00:00 EDT 1992}
}
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