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Title: Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis

Abstract

Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.

Authors:
;  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4]
  1. (National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, Triangle Park, NC (United States))
  2. (Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States))
  3. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))
  4. (Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6789143
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States); Journal Volume: 102:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; METALS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; OSTEOPOROSIS; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; ETIOLOGY; DISEASES; ELEMENTS; SKELETAL DISEASES 560300* -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology

Citation Formats

Goyer, R.A., Korach, K.S., Epstein, S., Bhattacharyya, M., and Pounds, J. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.2307/3431628.
Goyer, R.A., Korach, K.S., Epstein, S., Bhattacharyya, M., & Pounds, J. Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis. United States. doi:10.2307/3431628.
Goyer, R.A., Korach, K.S., Epstein, S., Bhattacharyya, M., and Pounds, J. 1994. "Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis". United States. doi:10.2307/3431628.
@article{osti_6789143,
title = {Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis},
author = {Goyer, R.A. and Korach, K.S. and Epstein, S. and Bhattacharyya, M. and Pounds, J.},
abstractNote = {Environmental risk factors for osteoporosis were reviewed at a conference held at the National Institute for Environmental Health Sciences 8-9 November 1993. The conference was co-sponsored by the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Disease and the NIH Office of Research in Women's Health. The objective of the conference was to review what is known about risk factors for osteoporosis and to identify gaps in the present state of knowledge that might be addressed by future research. The conference was divided into two broad themes. The first session focused on current knowledge regarding etiology, risk factors, and approaches to clinical and laboratory diagnosis. This was followed by three sessions in which various environmental pollutants were discussed. Topics selected for review included environmental agents that interfere with bone and calcium metabolism, such as the toxic metals lead, cadmium, aluminum, and fluoride, natural and antiestrogens, calcium, and vitamin D.},
doi = {10.2307/3431628},
journal = {Environmental Health Perspectives; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 102:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 4
}
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  • No abstract prepared.
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