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Title: Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar

Abstract

The Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site is the location of a decommissioned bunker on Fort Richardson, near Anchorage, Alaska. The site was used from World War II to the Korean War as part of an Alaskan communications network. The bunker and support buildings were vandalized following its decommissioning in the mid-1960s, resulting in PCB contamination of the bunker and soils around the above-ground transmitter annex. CRREL conducted a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigation of the site in June 1996, at the request of the Directorate of Public Works on Fort Richardson. Nine transect lines were established, each being profiled with 100- and 400-MHz antennas. Both antennas systems defined the extent of the bunker and identified the presence of buried utilities. The 100-MHz antenna provided large-scale resolution of the bunker, limits of site excavation, and large stratigraphic horizons in the undisturbed sediments. The 400-MHz antenna provided finer resolution that allowed identification of steel reinforcement in the bunker ceiling, utility walls and floor, and the walls of the inner and outer bunker. High amplitude resonance and hyperbolas in the record characterize the response from the Transmitter Annex foundation, buried pipes, and utilities. The GPR survey shows its utility for detecting the extent of abandonedmore » underground structures and identifying the extent of original ground excavations.« less

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Cold Regions Research and Engineering Lab., Hanover, NH (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
678878
Report Number(s):
AD-A-364131/XAB; CRREL-99-4
TRN: 92290200
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: Mar 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ALASKA; MILITARY FACILITIES; SITE CHARACTERIZATION; UNDERGROUND FACILITIES; DETECTION; RADAR; PERFORMANCE; SOILS; POLYCHLORINATED BIPHENYLS; MAPPING

Citation Formats

Hunter, L.E., Delaney, A.J., and Lawson, D.E. Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Hunter, L.E., Delaney, A.J., & Lawson, D.E. Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar. United States.
Hunter, L.E., Delaney, A.J., and Lawson, D.E. Mon . "Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_678878,
title = {Investigation of the Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site, Fort Richardson, Alaska, using ground penetrating radar},
author = {Hunter, L.E. and Delaney, A.J. and Lawson, D.E.},
abstractNote = {The Roosevelt Road Transmitter Site is the location of a decommissioned bunker on Fort Richardson, near Anchorage, Alaska. The site was used from World War II to the Korean War as part of an Alaskan communications network. The bunker and support buildings were vandalized following its decommissioning in the mid-1960s, resulting in PCB contamination of the bunker and soils around the above-ground transmitter annex. CRREL conducted a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) investigation of the site in June 1996, at the request of the Directorate of Public Works on Fort Richardson. Nine transect lines were established, each being profiled with 100- and 400-MHz antennas. Both antennas systems defined the extent of the bunker and identified the presence of buried utilities. The 100-MHz antenna provided large-scale resolution of the bunker, limits of site excavation, and large stratigraphic horizons in the undisturbed sediments. The 400-MHz antenna provided finer resolution that allowed identification of steel reinforcement in the bunker ceiling, utility walls and floor, and the walls of the inner and outer bunker. High amplitude resonance and hyperbolas in the record characterize the response from the Transmitter Annex foundation, buried pipes, and utilities. The GPR survey shows its utility for detecting the extent of abandoned underground structures and identifying the extent of original ground excavations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999},
month = {Mon Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1999}
}

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  • The Poleline Road Disposal Area (PRDA) is located on Fort Richardson Army Installation (FRA), approximately five miles northeast of Anchorage, Alaska. PRDA is centered on a longitude of E 145,000 and a latitude of N 134,000. The site, as known at this time, encompasses a 300 foot by 500 foot area of wooded land on FRA. An expanded site investigation confirmed the presence of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in soils and shallow ground water at the PRDA. This Technical Plan presents the field investigation procedures to conduct a Remedial Investigation (RI). The general purpose of the RI is to conductmore » a comprehensive site evaluation to determine the location of contaminant sources and the extent of both ground water and soil contamination. The investigation will also collect data required to determine whether the site conditions warrant remedial action or no further action. Specific objectives of the expanded site investigation are: (1) Determine site and contamination boundaries using soil gas survey; (2) Characterize the contamination occurring in, and the interrelationship between the shallow and deep aquifers at the PRDA; and (3) With trenching and soil sampling operations, characterize source areas identified in the ESI which have to potential of impacting media at the PRDA.« less
  • This study compares data from Cone Penetrometer Tests (CPT), high resolution surface reflection seismic (HRS) data and ground penetrating radar (GPR) data in the upper 120 feet (40 meters) of the A/M Area, Upper Three Runs Watershed at the Savannah River Site in South Carolina. The CPT, GPR, and HRS data were obtained along the Silverton Road in the western sector of the A/M Area groundwater plume, and adjacent to Geophysical Correlation Boring {number_sign}1 (GCB-1). This location allows for multiple correlations to be made between the various data sources, and supports shallow investigations for near surface affects of the Crackerneckmore » Fault, a major structural feature in the area. Borehole geophysical data from GCB-1 were used to provide subsurface constraints on the CPT, GPR, and HRS data. core data, natural gamma ray, spectral gamma data, multi-level induction resistivity, density and sonic data were utilized to distinguish clays, sands and silts. The CPT data provided tip bearing and sleeve stress, as an indicator of stratigraphy. Reflection seismic data provided continuous subsurface profiles of key marker horizons. Ground Penetrating Radar provided information on shallow subsurface geological features. Conclusions from this study suggest that there is a high degree of correlation between the CPT and borehole geophysical data, specifically, the Friction Ratio and gamma/spectral gamma curves. The Upland/Tobacco Road, Tobacco Road/Dry Branch, Dry Branch/Santee, Santee/Warley Hill and the Warley Hill/Congaree contacts are discernible. From these contacts it is possible to map structural relationships in the shallow subsurface that are tied to regional data. Because formation contacts are discernible, CPT, HRS, GPR, and geophysical log intra-formational anomalies are mappable. These features allow for stratigraphic and facies mapping using the GPR and HRS data for continuity and the CPT and geophysical data for lithofacies analysis. It is possible to use the combination of these tools to map shallow, stratigraphy and structure across the A/M Area.« less
  • In 1988 the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) placed Fort Richardson on the hazardous waste compliance docket. The principal public health exposure issue is the consumption of white phosphorus-contaminated waterfowl from Eagle River Flats. Although watefowl contamination by white phosphorus has been documented, it is not likely that people would consume sufficient contaminated waterfowl to result in a public health hazard. Institutional controls limit access to source areas, operable units and abandoned structures, have eliminated possible exposures to other sites of contamination and physical hazards within Fort Richardson.
  • Ground-penetrating imaging radar (GPIR) is proposed for large-area inspection of concrete and concrete/asphalt composite bridge decks and roadways. This technique combines ground-penetrating radar (GPR) with unique image reconstruction algorithms developed for identification and characterization of subsurface flaws and structural features. New data acquisition hardware and image reconstruction techniques, under development at LLNL, offer the possibility for reliable and efficient, high-resolution subsurface imaging through the use of improved ultra-wideband transmitters, antennas, and arrays, and enhanced image- and signal-processing software. A field test of a limited-capability prototype system is planned for FY-93, as is completion of a conceptual design for a practicalmore » inspection system. A follow-on program for FY-94 would focus on development and demonstration of an advanced bridge inspection system prototype based on the conceptual design completed during FY-93.« less
  • 'The project''s goals are threefold: (1) to examine the complementary site-characterization capabilities of modern, three-component shallow-seismic techniques and ground-penetrating radar (GPR) methods at depths ranging from 2 to 8 m at an existing test site; (2) to demonstrate the usefulness of the two methods when used in concert to characterize, in three-dimensions, the cone of depression of a pumping well, which will serve as a proxy site for fluid-flow at an actual, polluted site; and (3) to use the site as an outdoor mesoscale laboratory to validate existing three-dimensional ground-penetrating radar and seismic-reflection computer models developed at the Univ. ofmore » Kansas. To do this, useful seismic and GPR data are being collected along the same line(s) and within the same depth range. The principal investigators selected a site in central Kansas as a primary location and, although the site itself is not environmentally sensitive, the location chosen offers particularly useful attributes for this research and will serve as a proxy site for areas that are contaminated. As part of an effort to evaluate the strengths of each method, the authors will repeat the seismic and GPR surveys on a seasonal basis to establish how the complementary information obtained varies over time. Because the water table fluctuates at this site on a seasonal basis, variations in the two types of data over time also can be observed. Such noninvasive in-situ methods of identifying and characterizing the hydrologic flow regimes at contaminated sites support the prospect of developing effective, cost-conscious cleanup strategies in the near future. As of the end of May 1998, the project is on schedule. The first field work was conducted using both of the geophysical survey methods in October of 1997, and the second field survey employed both methods in March of 1998. One of the stated tasks is to reoccupy the same survey line on a quarterly basis for two years to examine change in both the seismic reflection data and the ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data over time. Two factors drive these changes: First, the soil-moisture conditions vary on a seasonal basis at the site. Second, the water table rises and falls on the order of one meter in response to changes in the level of the Arkansas River and in response to the many irrigation wells found nearby. At the test site in the Arkansas River alluvial valley near Great Bend, Kansas, surface material consists of unconsolidated medium- to coarse-grained sand interspersed with clay stringers and lenses deposited by the Arkansas River. A hand-augered test hole 5 meters from the seismic line revealed sand to a depth of about 1.5 meters, where a hard pan was found presumably a clay layer. At the time of the seismic and GPR surveys, the water table was at a depth of 2.1 meters, based on a measurement in a test well located 25 meters from the seismic line. A well drilled about 40 meters away from the seismic line encountered bedrock (a fine- to medium-grained Cretaceous-age sandstone) at a depth of 29 meters.'« less