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Title: Lead residues in eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) and their host plant (Prunus serotina) close to a major highway

Abstract

Eastern tent caterpillars, Malacosoma americanum (F.) (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), and leaves of their host plant, black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh., were collected in May, 1978, at various distances from the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, Prince George's Co., MD, and were analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Caterpillars collected within 10 m of the parkway contained 7.1 to 7.4 ppM lead (dry weight). Caterpillars collected at greater distances from the parkway and from a control area had lead concentrations ca. half as high (2.6 to 5.3 ppM). Lead concentrations in caterpillars averaged 76% as high as those in leaves and were much lower than concentrations that have been reported in some roadside soil and litter invertebrates.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fish and Wildlife Service, Laurel, MD
OSTI Identifier:
6787406
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6787406
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Environ. Entomol.; (United States); Journal Volume: 9:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; INSECTS; CONTAMINATION; LEAD; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; FOLIAR UPTAKE; LEAVES; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; LARVAE; MARYLAND; ROADS; SAMPLING; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SPECTROPHOTOMETRY; TREES; ANIMALS; ARTHROPODS; CENTRAL REGION; DATA; DISTRIBUTION; ELEMENTS; INFORMATION; INVERTEBRATES; METALS; NORTH AMERICA; NUMERICAL DATA; PLANTS; UPTAKE; USA 510200* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 560303 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Plants-- (-1987); 560304 -- Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology-- Invertebrates-- (-1987)

Citation Formats

Beyer, W.N., and Moore, J. Lead residues in eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) and their host plant (Prunus serotina) close to a major highway. United States: N. p., 1980. Web. doi:10.1093/ee/9.1.10.
Beyer, W.N., & Moore, J. Lead residues in eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) and their host plant (Prunus serotina) close to a major highway. United States. doi:10.1093/ee/9.1.10.
Beyer, W.N., and Moore, J. Fri . "Lead residues in eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) and their host plant (Prunus serotina) close to a major highway". United States. doi:10.1093/ee/9.1.10.
@article{osti_6787406,
title = {Lead residues in eastern tent caterpillars (Malacosoma americanum) and their host plant (Prunus serotina) close to a major highway},
author = {Beyer, W.N. and Moore, J.},
abstractNote = {Eastern tent caterpillars, Malacosoma americanum (F.) (Lepidoptera: Lasiocampidae), and leaves of their host plant, black cherry, Prunus serotina Ehrh., were collected in May, 1978, at various distances from the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, Prince George's Co., MD, and were analyzed for lead by atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Caterpillars collected within 10 m of the parkway contained 7.1 to 7.4 ppM lead (dry weight). Caterpillars collected at greater distances from the parkway and from a control area had lead concentrations ca. half as high (2.6 to 5.3 ppM). Lead concentrations in caterpillars averaged 76% as high as those in leaves and were much lower than concentrations that have been reported in some roadside soil and litter invertebrates.},
doi = {10.1093/ee/9.1.10},
journal = {Environ. Entomol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 9:1,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1980},
month = {Fri Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 1980}
}
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