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Title: Severe accident sequences simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station

Abstract

Different severe accident sequences employing the MELCOR code, version 1.8.4 QK, have been simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (Grand Gulf). The postulated severe accidents simulated are two low-pressure, short-term, station blackouts; two unmitigated small-break (SB) loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) (SBLOCAs); and one unmitigated large LOCA (LLOCA). The purpose of this study was to calculate best-estimate timings of events and source terms for a wide range of severe accidents and to compare the plant response to these accidents.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
678147
Report Number(s):
CONF-990605-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 99:009132
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; Journal Volume: 80; Conference: 1999 annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), Boston, MA (United States), 6-10 Jun 1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
22 NUCLEAR REACTOR TECHNOLOGY; 21 NUCLEAR POWER REACTORS AND ASSOCIATED PLANTS; GRAND GULF-1 REACTOR; REACTOR ACCIDENTS; M CODES; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; SOURCE TERMS

Citation Formats

Carbajo, J.J. Severe accident sequences simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Carbajo, J.J. Severe accident sequences simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station. United States.
Carbajo, J.J. Wed . "Severe accident sequences simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_678147,
title = {Severe accident sequences simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station},
author = {Carbajo, J.J.},
abstractNote = {Different severe accident sequences employing the MELCOR code, version 1.8.4 QK, have been simulated at the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station (Grand Gulf). The postulated severe accidents simulated are two low-pressure, short-term, station blackouts; two unmitigated small-break (SB) loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) (SBLOCAs); and one unmitigated large LOCA (LLOCA). The purpose of this study was to calculate best-estimate timings of events and source terms for a wide range of severe accidents and to compare the plant response to these accidents.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999},
month = {Wed Sep 01 00:00:00 EDT 1999}
}
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