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Title: Residual stress analysis for engineering applications by means of neutron diffraction

Abstract

Residual stresses originate from spatial differences in plastic deformation, temperature, or phase distribution, introduced by manufacturing processes or during service. Engineering parts and materials experience mechanical, thermal, and chemical loads during their service, and most of these loads introduce stresses that are superimposed on the already existing residual stresses. Residual stresses can therefore limit or improve life and strength of engineering parts; knowledge and understanding of these stresses is therefore critical for optimizing strength and durability. The economic and scientific importance of neutron diffraction residual stress analysis has led to an increasing number of suitable instruments worldwide. All of the major sources due in the next several years will have instruments for the sole purpose of performing residual stress and texture measurements. Recently, a dedicated, state-of-the-art diffractometer has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology reactor. It has been used for a variety of measurements on basic and engineering stress problems. Among the most prominent examples that have been investigated in collaboration with industrial and academic partners are residual stresses in rails, weldments, and plasma-sprayed coatings.

Authors:
 [1]; ;  [2]
  1. Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)|[National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
  2. National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
678122
Report Number(s):
CONF-990605-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 99:009107
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Transactions of the American Nuclear Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Conference: 1999 annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), Boston, MA (United States), 6-10 Jun 1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 66 PHYSICS; RESIDUAL STRESSES; STRESS ANALYSIS; NEUTRON DIFFRACTION; MATERIALS; WELDED JOINTS; SPRAYED COATINGS

Citation Formats

Gnaeupel-Herold, T., Brand, P.C., and Prask, H.J. Residual stress analysis for engineering applications by means of neutron diffraction. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Gnaeupel-Herold, T., Brand, P.C., & Prask, H.J. Residual stress analysis for engineering applications by means of neutron diffraction. United States.
Gnaeupel-Herold, T., Brand, P.C., and Prask, H.J. Wed . "Residual stress analysis for engineering applications by means of neutron diffraction". United States.
@article{osti_678122,
title = {Residual stress analysis for engineering applications by means of neutron diffraction},
author = {Gnaeupel-Herold, T. and Brand, P.C. and Prask, H.J.},
abstractNote = {Residual stresses originate from spatial differences in plastic deformation, temperature, or phase distribution, introduced by manufacturing processes or during service. Engineering parts and materials experience mechanical, thermal, and chemical loads during their service, and most of these loads introduce stresses that are superimposed on the already existing residual stresses. Residual stresses can therefore limit or improve life and strength of engineering parts; knowledge and understanding of these stresses is therefore critical for optimizing strength and durability. The economic and scientific importance of neutron diffraction residual stress analysis has led to an increasing number of suitable instruments worldwide. All of the major sources due in the next several years will have instruments for the sole purpose of performing residual stress and texture measurements. Recently, a dedicated, state-of-the-art diffractometer has been installed at the National Institute of Standards and Technology reactor. It has been used for a variety of measurements on basic and engineering stress problems. Among the most prominent examples that have been investigated in collaboration with industrial and academic partners are residual stresses in rails, weldments, and plasma-sprayed coatings.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}