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Title: Preliminary formulation studies for a ``hydroceramic`` alternative waste form for INEEL HLW

Abstract

Herein the authors discuss scoping studies performed to develop an efficient way to prepare the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) nominally high-level ({approximately}40 W/m{sup 3}) calcined radioactive waste (HLW) and liquid metal (sodium) reactor coolants for disposal. The investigated approach implements the chemistry of Hanford`s cancrinite-making clay reaction process via Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) formed-under-elevated-temperatures-and-pressures concrete monolith-making technology to make hydroceramics (HCs). The HCs differ from conventional Portland cement/blast furnace slag (PC/BFS) grouts in that the binder minerals formed during the curing process are hydrated alkali-aluminosilicates (feldspathoids-sodalites, cancrinites, and zeolites) rather than hydrated calcium silicates (CSH). This is desirable because (a) US defense-type radioactive wastes generally contain much more sodium and aluminum than calcium; (b) sodalites/cancrinites do a much better job of retaining the anionic components of real radioactive waste (e.g., nitrate) than do calcium silicates; (c) natural feldspathoids form from glasses (and therefore are more stable) in that region of the United States where a repository for this sort of waste could be sited; and (d) if eventually deemed necessary, feldspathoid-type concrete wasteforms could be hot-isostatically-pressed into even more durable materials without removing them from their original canisters.

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]
  1. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
678106
Report Number(s):
CONF-990605-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 99:009091
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Transactions of the American Nuclear Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Conference: 1999 annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), Boston, MA (United States), 6-10 Jun 1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 05 NUCLEAR FUELS; WASTE FORMS; IDAHO NATIONAL ENGINEERING LABORATORY; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; LIQUID METALS; SODIUM; LEACHING; CERAMICS; RELIABILITY

Citation Formats

Siemer, D.D., Gougar, M.L.D., Grutzeck, M.W., and Scheetz, B.E. Preliminary formulation studies for a ``hydroceramic`` alternative waste form for INEEL HLW. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Siemer, D.D., Gougar, M.L.D., Grutzeck, M.W., & Scheetz, B.E. Preliminary formulation studies for a ``hydroceramic`` alternative waste form for INEEL HLW. United States.
Siemer, D.D., Gougar, M.L.D., Grutzeck, M.W., and Scheetz, B.E. Wed . "Preliminary formulation studies for a ``hydroceramic`` alternative waste form for INEEL HLW". United States.
@article{osti_678106,
title = {Preliminary formulation studies for a ``hydroceramic`` alternative waste form for INEEL HLW},
author = {Siemer, D.D. and Gougar, M.L.D. and Grutzeck, M.W. and Scheetz, B.E.},
abstractNote = {Herein the authors discuss scoping studies performed to develop an efficient way to prepare the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) nominally high-level ({approximately}40 W/m{sup 3}) calcined radioactive waste (HLW) and liquid metal (sodium) reactor coolants for disposal. The investigated approach implements the chemistry of Hanford`s cancrinite-making clay reaction process via Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) formed-under-elevated-temperatures-and-pressures concrete monolith-making technology to make hydroceramics (HCs). The HCs differ from conventional Portland cement/blast furnace slag (PC/BFS) grouts in that the binder minerals formed during the curing process are hydrated alkali-aluminosilicates (feldspathoids-sodalites, cancrinites, and zeolites) rather than hydrated calcium silicates (CSH). This is desirable because (a) US defense-type radioactive wastes generally contain much more sodium and aluminum than calcium; (b) sodalites/cancrinites do a much better job of retaining the anionic components of real radioactive waste (e.g., nitrate) than do calcium silicates; (c) natural feldspathoids form from glasses (and therefore are more stable) in that region of the United States where a repository for this sort of waste could be sited; and (d) if eventually deemed necessary, feldspathoid-type concrete wasteforms could be hot-isostatically-pressed into even more durable materials without removing them from their original canisters.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}