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Title: Recognition of threshold dose model: Avoiding continued excessive regulation

Abstract

The purpose of this work is to examine the relationships between radiation dose-response models and associated regulations. The objective of radiation protection regulations is to protect workers and the public from harm resulting from excessive exposure to radiation. The regulations generally stipulate various levels of radiation dose rate to individuals or limit concentrations of radionuclides in releases to water or the atmosphere. The cleanup standards applied in remedial action for contaminated sites limit the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, groundwater, or structures, for release of sites to other uses. The guiding philosophy is that less is better and none is better yet. This has culminated with the concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In fact, all regulations currently in place are arbitrarily based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) dose-response relationship. This concept came into use several decades ago and simply assumes that the incidence of health effects observed at a high dose or high dose rate will decrease linearly with dose or dose rate all the way down to zero, with no threshold level. Subsequent data have accumulated and continue to accumulate, demonstrating that there is a threshold level for net damage and, further, that there ismore » a net benefit (radiation hormesis) at levels below the threshold level. It is concluded that recognition of the validity of a threshold model can be done on the basis of presently known data and that changes in regulations should be started at this time to avoid further unnecessary losses due to continued excessive regulation. As results from new research come in, refinement of interim values proposed in revised regulations can be incorporated.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
678091
Report Number(s):
CONF-990605-
Journal ID: TANSAO; ISSN 0003-018X; TRN: 99:009077
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Transactions of the American Nuclear Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 80; Conference: 1999 annual meeting of the American Nuclear Society (ANS), Boston, MA (United States), 6-10 Jun 1999; Other Information: PBD: 1999
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; RADIATION DOSES; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; RADIATION PROTECTION; ALARA; REGULATIONS; BIOSPHERE; REMEDIAL ACTION; MATHEMATICAL MODELS

Citation Formats

Logan, S.E. Recognition of threshold dose model: Avoiding continued excessive regulation. United States: N. p., 1999. Web.
Logan, S.E. Recognition of threshold dose model: Avoiding continued excessive regulation. United States.
Logan, S.E. Wed . "Recognition of threshold dose model: Avoiding continued excessive regulation". United States.
@article{osti_678091,
title = {Recognition of threshold dose model: Avoiding continued excessive regulation},
author = {Logan, S.E.},
abstractNote = {The purpose of this work is to examine the relationships between radiation dose-response models and associated regulations. The objective of radiation protection regulations is to protect workers and the public from harm resulting from excessive exposure to radiation. The regulations generally stipulate various levels of radiation dose rate to individuals or limit concentrations of radionuclides in releases to water or the atmosphere. The cleanup standards applied in remedial action for contaminated sites limit the concentrations of radionuclides in soil, groundwater, or structures, for release of sites to other uses. The guiding philosophy is that less is better and none is better yet. This has culminated with the concept of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In fact, all regulations currently in place are arbitrarily based on the linear no-threshold hypothesis (LNTH) dose-response relationship. This concept came into use several decades ago and simply assumes that the incidence of health effects observed at a high dose or high dose rate will decrease linearly with dose or dose rate all the way down to zero, with no threshold level. Subsequent data have accumulated and continue to accumulate, demonstrating that there is a threshold level for net damage and, further, that there is a net benefit (radiation hormesis) at levels below the threshold level. It is concluded that recognition of the validity of a threshold model can be done on the basis of presently known data and that changes in regulations should be started at this time to avoid further unnecessary losses due to continued excessive regulation. As results from new research come in, refinement of interim values proposed in revised regulations can be incorporated.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society},
number = ,
volume = 80,
place = {United States},
year = {1999},
month = {9}
}