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Title: Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.

Abstract

This study was undertaken to investigate the potential for reducing use of electrical energy at lumber dry kilns by reducing fan speeds part way through the lumber drying process. It included three tasks: to quantify energy savings at a typical mill through field tests; to investigate the level of electric energy use at a representative sample of other mills and thereby to estimate the transferability of the conservation to the region; and to prepare a guidebook to present the technology to mill operators, and to allow them to estimate the economic value of adopting the technique at their facilities. This document reports on the first two tasks.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Carroll, Hatch and Associates, Inc., Portland, OR (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6779026
Report Number(s):
DOE/BP-23462-1
ON: DE87006184
DOE Contract Number:
AC79-85BP23462
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted; Related Information: To be used with report DOE/BP-23462-2: "Guidebook to electrical energy savings at lumber dry kilns through fan speed reduction."
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; WOOD; DRYING; WOOD PRODUCTS INDUSTRY; ENERGY CONSERVATION; BLOWERS; FIELD TESTS; KILNS; SURVEYS; TECHNOLOGY TRANSFER; INDUSTRY; TESTING Kilns; Lumber - Drying - Energy conservation 320303* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Industrial & Agricultural Processes-- Equipment & Processes

Citation Formats

Carroll, Hatch & Associates. Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.. United States: N. p., 1987. Web.
Carroll, Hatch & Associates. Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.. United States.
Carroll, Hatch & Associates. 1987. "Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6779026,
title = {Additional Sawmill Electrical Energy Study.},
author = {Carroll, Hatch & Associates.},
abstractNote = {This study was undertaken to investigate the potential for reducing use of electrical energy at lumber dry kilns by reducing fan speeds part way through the lumber drying process. It included three tasks: to quantify energy savings at a typical mill through field tests; to investigate the level of electric energy use at a representative sample of other mills and thereby to estimate the transferability of the conservation to the region; and to prepare a guidebook to present the technology to mill operators, and to allow them to estimate the economic value of adopting the technique at their facilities. This document reports on the first two tasks.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1987,
month = 2
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
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