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Title: Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells

Abstract

Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will bemore » generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.« less

Authors:
; ; ;  [1]; ;  [2]
  1. (Univ. of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States))
  2. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6758419
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Genomics; (United States); Journal Volume: 19:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CHROMOSOMAL ABERRATIONS; DETECTION; LEUKEMIA; PATHOGENESIS; GENE REGULATION; HUMAN CHROMOSOME 8; CHROMOSOMES; DISEASES; HUMAN CHROMOSOMES; IMMUNE SYSTEM DISEASES; MUTATIONS; NEOPLASMS 550400* -- Genetics

Citation Formats

Sen, S., Zhou, Hongyi, Stass, S.A., Sen, P., Mulac-Jericevic, B., and Pirrotta, V. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells. United States: N. p., 1994. Web. doi:10.1006/geno.1994.1104.
Sen, S., Zhou, Hongyi, Stass, S.A., Sen, P., Mulac-Jericevic, B., & Pirrotta, V. Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells. United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1994.1104.
Sen, S., Zhou, Hongyi, Stass, S.A., Sen, P., Mulac-Jericevic, B., and Pirrotta, V. 1994. "Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells". United States. doi:10.1006/geno.1994.1104.
@article{osti_6758419,
title = {Microdissected double-minute DNA detects variable patterns of chromosomal localizations and multiple abundantly expressed transcripts in normal and leukemic cells},
author = {Sen, S. and Zhou, Hongyi and Stass, S.A. and Sen, P. and Mulac-Jericevic, B. and Pirrotta, V.},
abstractNote = {Double-minute (dm) chromosomes are cytogenetically resolvable DNA amplification-mediating acentric extrachromosomal structures that are commonly seen in primary tumors, tumor cell lines, and drug-resistant cells grown in vitro. Selective isolation of dm DNAs with standard molecular biological techniques is difficult, and thus, detailed studies to elucidate their structure, site of chromosomal origin, and chromosomal reintegration patterns have been limited. In those instances in which a gene has been localized on dms, characterization of the remainder of the DNA, which far exceeds the size of the gene identified, has remained inconclusive. dms seen in the acute myeloid leukemia cell line HL-60 have been shown to harbor the c-myc protooncogene. In this paper, the authors report the successful isolation of the dm-specific DNAs from these cells by the microdissection/polymerase chain reaction technique and demonstrate that the dm DNAs derived from a single discrete normal chromosome segment 8q24.1-q24.2 reintegrate at various specific locations in the leukemic cells. The microdissected dm DNA detects multiple abundantly expressed transcripts distinct from c-myc mRNA on Northern blots. By devising a [open quotes]transcript selection[close quotes] strategy, they cloned the partial genomic sequence of a gene from the microdissected DNA that encodes two of these RNAs. This strategy will be generally applicable for rapid cloning of unknown amplified genes harbored on dms. With DNA from 20 microdissected dms, they constructed a genomic library of about 20,000 recombinant microclones with an average insert size of about 450 bp. The microclones should help in isolating corresponding yeast artificial chromosome clones for high-resolution physical mapping of dms in HL-60 cells. Furthermore, application of the microdissection technique appears to be an extremely feasible approach to characterization of dms in other cell types. 42 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.},
doi = {10.1006/geno.1994.1104},
journal = {Genomics; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 19:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month = 2
}
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