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Title: Seasonal thermal energy storage

Abstract

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6758136
Report Number(s):
PNL-5067
ON: DE84013854
DOE Contract Number:
AC06-76RL01830
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products. Original copy available until stock is exhausted
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
25 ENERGY STORAGE; SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE; AQUIFERS; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; ALABAMA; CANADA; CAVES; CHINA; DENMARK; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF GERMANY; FIELD TESTS; FRANCE; ICE; LAKES; MINNESOTA; NETHERLANDS; NEW YORK; PONDS; ROCKS; SOILS; SWEDEN; SWITZERLAND; TANKS; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; TEST FACILITIES; ASIA; CAVITIES; CONTAINERS; ECONOMICS; ENERGY STORAGE; EUROPE; FEDERAL REGION II; FEDERAL REGION IV; FEDERAL REGION V; HEAT STORAGE; NORTH AMERICA; SCANDINAVIA; STORAGE; SURFACE WATERS; TESTING; USA; WESTERN EUROPE 250600* -- Energy Storage-- Thermal

Citation Formats

Allen, R.D., Kannberg, L.D., and Raymond, J.R.. Seasonal thermal energy storage. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2172/6758136.
Allen, R.D., Kannberg, L.D., & Raymond, J.R.. Seasonal thermal energy storage. United States. doi:10.2172/6758136.
Allen, R.D., Kannberg, L.D., and Raymond, J.R.. 1984. "Seasonal thermal energy storage". United States. doi:10.2172/6758136. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6758136.
@article{osti_6758136,
title = {Seasonal thermal energy storage},
author = {Allen, R.D. and Kannberg, L.D. and Raymond, J.R.},
abstractNote = {This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.},
doi = {10.2172/6758136},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 5
}

Technical Report:

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  • This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstrationmore » project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)« less
  • Thermal energy storage enables the capture and retention of heat energy (or cold) during one time period for use during another. Seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) involves a period of months between the input and recovery of energy. The purpose of this study was to make a preliminary investigation and evaluation of potential nonaquifer STES systems. Current literature was surveyed to determine the state of the art of thermal energy storage (TES) systems such as hot water pond storage, hot rock storage, cool ice storage, and other more sophisticated concepts which might have potential for future STES programs. The mainmore » energy sources for TES principally waste heat, and the main uses of the stored thermal energy, i.e., heating, cooling, and steam generation are described. This report reviews the development of sensible, latent, and thermochemical TES technologies, presents a preliminary evaluation of the TES methods most applicable to seasonal storage uses, outlines preliminary conclusions drawn from the review of current TES literature, and recommends further research based on these conclusions. A bibliography of the nonaquifer STES literature review, and examples of 53 different TES concepts drawn from the literature are provided. (LCL)« less
  • This report discusses recent progress in the DOE program, directed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory, to develop seasonal thermal energy storage (STES). STES has been identified as one method to substantially improve energy efficiency and economics in certain sectors of our economy. It provides a potentially economic means of using waste heat and climatic energy resources to meet a significant portion of our growing energy need for building and industrial process heating and cooling. Environmental benefits accompany the use of STES in many applications. Furthermore, STES can contribute to reduced reliance on premium fuels that are often obtained from foreign sources.more » Lastly by improving the energy economics of industry, STES can contribute to improved US industrial competitiveness. The report is provided in four sections; the first being this introduction Section 2 of the report describes the program and briefly documents its organization, goals, history, and long-term plans. Section 3 describes the progress during the period from April, 1986, through March, 1988. Section 4 provides a short update on international development of STES. 17 refs., 16 figs., 7 tabs.« less
  • Ten papers from the contractors review meeting on seasonal thermal energy storage (STES) are included. STES demonstration programs involving aquifers, environmental effects studies, legal aspects, economics, numerical simulation, and field testing are discussed. (LCL)
  • During fiscal year 1979 (October 1978-September 1979) major LBL work involved the numerical modeling of the recently completed hot water storage field experiments at Auburn University. Work was also done, under separate funding, on the basic understanding of thermal stratification dispersion, and buoyancy flow in an aquifer used for hot or cold water storage. These questions are crucial in determining the efficiency of aquifer storage and will be discussed elsewhere. The results of the simulation of Auburn field experiments are summarized.