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Title: Evaluate energy at its market value

Abstract

Two utilities now use the market value of energy in their engineering studies. It is much easier to calculate the value of power with this approach than with conventional methods, and far fewer assumptions are required. The logic of this method should make results much easier to defend to management and before regulatory commissions. Also, since value of power is easier to calculate, it can be updated frequently and the most current value used in studies, thus improving the accuracy of management decisions.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lower Valley Power and Light Inc., Afton, WY
OSTI Identifier:
6755144
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Electr. World; (United States); Journal Volume: 196:7
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ELECTRIC POWER; COST; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; ELECTRIC UTILITIES; POWER GENERATION; POWER TRANSMISSION; PRESENT WORTH METHOD; ECONOMICS; POWER; PUBLIC UTILITIES 296000* -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Electric Power

Citation Formats

Bell, L.A. Jr. Evaluate energy at its market value. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Bell, L.A. Jr. Evaluate energy at its market value. United States.
Bell, L.A. Jr. 1982. "Evaluate energy at its market value". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6755144,
title = {Evaluate energy at its market value},
author = {Bell, L.A. Jr.},
abstractNote = {Two utilities now use the market value of energy in their engineering studies. It is much easier to calculate the value of power with this approach than with conventional methods, and far fewer assumptions are required. The logic of this method should make results much easier to defend to management and before regulatory commissions. Also, since value of power is easier to calculate, it can be updated frequently and the most current value used in studies, thus improving the accuracy of management decisions.},
doi = {},
journal = {Electr. World; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 196:7,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month = 7
}
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