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Title: Environmentalism and the new conservatives

Abstract

The environmental movement has grown, gaining political power and attracting the affluent middle class. Environmentalism's claim that the US has suffered from the attendant ills of too much prosperity and too rapid economic growth is also evident in the Green movement in Germany, both pursuing liberal politics. Charges that the movement is manned by persons of privilege and that it is inherently conservative can be backed by demographic statistics. Citing a range of philosophical writers, from Paul Ehrich to Karl Marx, the author demonstrates the conservative basis for environmentalism and the linking of man and nature. The social implications of limiting economic growth overlook the connection with material betterment and the quality of life.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6749940
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6749940
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. For.; (United States); Journal Volume: 89:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY; SOCIO-ECONOMIC FACTORS; RESOURCE CONSERVATION; ECONOMIC GROWTH; QUALITY OF LIFE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; INSTITUTIONAL FACTORS 530100* -- Environmental-Social Aspects of Energy Technologies-- Social & Economic Studies-- (-1989); 290200 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Economics & Sociology; 290300 -- Energy Planning & Policy-- Environment, Health, & Safety

Citation Formats

Popovich, L. Environmentalism and the new conservatives. United States: N. p., 1983. Web.
Popovich, L. Environmentalism and the new conservatives. United States.
Popovich, L. Tue . "Environmentalism and the new conservatives". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6749940,
title = {Environmentalism and the new conservatives},
author = {Popovich, L.},
abstractNote = {The environmental movement has grown, gaining political power and attracting the affluent middle class. Environmentalism's claim that the US has suffered from the attendant ills of too much prosperity and too rapid economic growth is also evident in the Green movement in Germany, both pursuing liberal politics. Charges that the movement is manned by persons of privilege and that it is inherently conservative can be backed by demographic statistics. Citing a range of philosophical writers, from Paul Ehrich to Karl Marx, the author demonstrates the conservative basis for environmentalism and the linking of man and nature. The social implications of limiting economic growth overlook the connection with material betterment and the quality of life.},
doi = {},
journal = {Am. For.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 89:3,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1983},
month = {Tue Mar 01 00:00:00 EST 1983}
}
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