skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Selection and cultivation of final vegetative cover for closed waste sites at the Savannah River Site, SC

Abstract

Low-level, hazardous, and mixed waste disposal sites normally require some form of plant material to prevent erosion of the final closure cap. Waste disposal sites are closed and capped in a complex scientific manner to minimize water infiltration and percolation into and through the waste material. Turf type grasses are currently being used as a vegetative cover for most sites. Consequently, the sites require periodic mowing and other expensive annual maintenance practices. The purpose of this five year study was to evaluate alternative plant material for use on wastes sites that is quickly and easily established and economically maintained, retards water infiltration, provides maximum year-round evapotranspiration, is ecologically acceptable and does not harm the closure cap. The results of the study are described in this report and suggest that two species of bamboo (Phyllostachys bissetii and P. rubromarainata) can be utilized to provide long lived, low maintenance, climax vegetation for the waste sites. These large species of bamboo will also reduce the probability of intrusion by humans, animals and deeply rooted plant species.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
  2. Soil Conservation Service, Raleigh, NC (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE; USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6745152
Report Number(s):
WSRC-MS-92-513; CONF-930205-3
ON: DE93006884
DOE Contract Number:  
AC09-89SR18035
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Waste management '93, Tucson, AZ (United States), 28 Feb - 4 Mar 1993
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BAMBOO; FIELD TESTS; HAZARDOUS MATERIALS; GROUND DISPOSAL; LOW-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES; SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE FORMS; CONTAINMENT; HUMAN INTRUSION; PLANTS; SOILS; US DOA; GRAMINEAE; LILIOPSIDA; MAGNOLIOPHYTA; MANAGEMENT; MATERIALS; NATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS; RADIOACTIVE MATERIALS; RADIOACTIVE WASTES; TESTING; US AEC; US DOE; US ERDA; US ORGANIZATIONS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTES; 052002* - Nuclear Fuels- Waste Disposal & Storage; 540210 - Environment, Terrestrial- Basic Studies- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Cook, J R, and Salvo, S K. Selection and cultivation of final vegetative cover for closed waste sites at the Savannah River Site, SC. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Cook, J R, & Salvo, S K. Selection and cultivation of final vegetative cover for closed waste sites at the Savannah River Site, SC. United States.
Cook, J R, and Salvo, S K. Wed . "Selection and cultivation of final vegetative cover for closed waste sites at the Savannah River Site, SC". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6745152.
@article{osti_6745152,
title = {Selection and cultivation of final vegetative cover for closed waste sites at the Savannah River Site, SC},
author = {Cook, J R and Salvo, S K},
abstractNote = {Low-level, hazardous, and mixed waste disposal sites normally require some form of plant material to prevent erosion of the final closure cap. Waste disposal sites are closed and capped in a complex scientific manner to minimize water infiltration and percolation into and through the waste material. Turf type grasses are currently being used as a vegetative cover for most sites. Consequently, the sites require periodic mowing and other expensive annual maintenance practices. The purpose of this five year study was to evaluate alternative plant material for use on wastes sites that is quickly and easily established and economically maintained, retards water infiltration, provides maximum year-round evapotranspiration, is ecologically acceptable and does not harm the closure cap. The results of the study are described in this report and suggest that two species of bamboo (Phyllostachys bissetii and P. rubromarainata) can be utilized to provide long lived, low maintenance, climax vegetation for the waste sites. These large species of bamboo will also reduce the probability of intrusion by humans, animals and deeply rooted plant species.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1992},
month = {1}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: