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Title: U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal

Abstract

Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6743118
Report Number(s):
CONF-820605-23
ON: DE83900136
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: World hydrogen energy conference, Pasadena, CA, USA, 13 Jun 1982
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
08 HYDROGEN; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; HYDROGEN PRODUCTION; U-GAS PROCESS; ASHES; COAL; ECONOMICS; FLUIDIZED BED; PILOT PLANTS; RECOVERY; REMOVAL; SELEXOL PROCESS; SHIFT PROCESSES; SULFUR; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; COAL GASIFICATION; ELEMENTS; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; FUNCTIONAL MODELS; GASIFICATION; MATERIALS; NONMETALS; RESIDUES; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES 080107* -- Hydrogen-- Production-- Coal Gasification; 010404 -- Coal, Lignite, & Peat-- Gasification

Citation Formats

Dihu, R.J., and Patel, J.G.. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal. United States: N. p., 1982. Web.
Dihu, R.J., & Patel, J.G.. U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal. United States.
Dihu, R.J., and Patel, J.G.. 1982. "U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6743118,
title = {U-GAS process for production of hydrogen from coal},
author = {Dihu, R.J. and Patel, J.G.},
abstractNote = {Today, hydrogen is produced mainly from natural gas and petroleum fractions. Tomorrow, because reserves of natural gas and oil are declining while demand continues to increase, they cannot be considered available for long-term, large-scale production of hydrogen. Hydrogen obtained from coal is expected to be the lowest cost, large-scale source of hydrogen in the future. The U-GAS coal gasification process and its potential application to the manufacture of hydrogen is discussed. Pilot plant results, the current status of the process, and economic projections for the cost of hydrogen manufactured are presented.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • The K-T process for partial oxidation of various coals, coke, char, tars, heavy residua, or light to heavy oils yields 300 Btu/cu ft syngas containing typically 50-55Vertical Bar3< CO and 30-35Vertical Bar3< H/sub 2/ from coal or 45Vertical Bar3< each CO and H/sub 2/ from liquid feedstocks. If hydrogen is desired as the end product, the raw syngas is treated with steam at 550/sup 0/F over sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalyst to oxidize CO into H/sub 2/ and CO/sub 2/. The product gas is sent into a Rectisol acid gas removal system, which uses methanol to selectively absorb CO/sub 2/ and H/submore » 2/S. The clean gas, still containing 1.8Vertical Bar3< CO and 50 ppm CO/sub 2/, then undergoes methanation, which reduces the CO content to 5 ppm, and molecular sieve absorption, to reduce CO/sub 2/ and water to 3 ppm. The estimated costs of producing 100 million cu ft/day of 97.4Vertical Bar3< purity hydrogen are $5.50-$7.00/million BTU, depending on plant location, environmental regulations, the costs of the feedstocks and utilities, and the financing method.« less
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