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Title: Sources and fates of aromatic compounds in urban storm-water runoff

Abstract

Petroleum-derived aromatic hydrocarbons and associated sulfur compounds in urban storm-water runoff and Delaware River sediment samples were characterized with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization/sulfur specific flame photometric detection system. Total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations were determined gravimetrically in storm water emanating from a northern Philadelphian storm sewer. Comparison of hydrocarbon and sulfur fingerprints of the aromatic fractions of environmental samples with reference oils indicated that crankcase oil was the most likely source of aromatics in storm-water runoff. A weathering study on used crankcase oils showed a loss of diaromatics which accounted for their absence in the environmental samples. Since aromatic sulfur compounds were preferentially associated with particulate matter in urban runoff, a mechanism was proposed in which fuel oils and lubricating oils released to the environment are adsorbed onto particulate matter. The lower boiling diaromatics are lost through natural weathering, and during a storm, the particulates are washed into sewers and then into receiving waters.

Authors:
 [1];
  1. (EPA)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
EPA; Rutgers Univ.
OSTI Identifier:
6730181
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6730181
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 13:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 02 PETROLEUM; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; FUNCTIONAL MODELS; PETROLEUM; HYDROCARBONS; RUNOFF; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; SEDIMENTS; URBAN AREAS; AROMATICS; DELAWARE RIVER; GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; WEATHERING; CHROMATOGRAPHY; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; MASS TRANSFER; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; RIVERS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989); 020900 -- Petroleum-- Environmental Aspects

Citation Formats

Mackenzie, M.J., and Hunter, J.V. Sources and fates of aromatic compounds in urban storm-water runoff. United States: N. p., 1979. Web. doi:10.1021/es60150a011.
Mackenzie, M.J., & Hunter, J.V. Sources and fates of aromatic compounds in urban storm-water runoff. United States. doi:10.1021/es60150a011.
Mackenzie, M.J., and Hunter, J.V. Thu . "Sources and fates of aromatic compounds in urban storm-water runoff". United States. doi:10.1021/es60150a011.
@article{osti_6730181,
title = {Sources and fates of aromatic compounds in urban storm-water runoff},
author = {Mackenzie, M.J. and Hunter, J.V.},
abstractNote = {Petroleum-derived aromatic hydrocarbons and associated sulfur compounds in urban storm-water runoff and Delaware River sediment samples were characterized with a gas chromatograph equipped with a flame ionization/sulfur specific flame photometric detection system. Total petroleum hydrocarbon concentrations were determined gravimetrically in storm water emanating from a northern Philadelphian storm sewer. Comparison of hydrocarbon and sulfur fingerprints of the aromatic fractions of environmental samples with reference oils indicated that crankcase oil was the most likely source of aromatics in storm-water runoff. A weathering study on used crankcase oils showed a loss of diaromatics which accounted for their absence in the environmental samples. Since aromatic sulfur compounds were preferentially associated with particulate matter in urban runoff, a mechanism was proposed in which fuel oils and lubricating oils released to the environment are adsorbed onto particulate matter. The lower boiling diaromatics are lost through natural weathering, and during a storm, the particulates are washed into sewers and then into receiving waters.},
doi = {10.1021/es60150a011},
journal = {Environ. Sci. Technol.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 13:2,
place = {United States},
year = {1979},
month = {2}
}