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Title: Superconducting Bi sub 1. 5 Pb sub 0. 5 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization

Abstract

A glass of nominal Bi{sub 1.5}Pb{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} composition, prepared by rapid quenching of the melt, showed a glass transition temperature of 383 {degree}C, crystallization temperature of 446 {degree}C, melting temperature of 855 {degree}C, and bulk density of 5.69 g/cm{sup 3} in air. The activation energy for crystallization of the glass has been estimated to be 292 kJ/mol from nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry. On heating in oxygen, the glass showed a slow and continuous weight gain starting at 530 {degree}C which reached a plateau at 820 {degree}C. The weight gained during heating was retained on cooling to ambient conditions indicating an irreversible oxidation step. The influence of annealing conditions on the formation of various phases in the glass has been investigated. The Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0}Cu{sub 1}O{sub 6} phase crystallized out first followed by formation of other phases at higher temperatures. The high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} phase, isostructural with Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, was not detected below 840 {degree}C, but its fraction increased with the annealing time at 840 {degree}C. A sample annealed at 840 {degree}C for 243 h in air and furnace cooled showed the highest {ital T}{sub {ital c}}({ital R}=0) of 107.2more » K and a narrow transition width, {Delta}{ital T}{sub {ital c}} (10%--90%), of 2 K. The high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} phase does not seem to crystallize out directly from the glass but is rather produced at high temperature by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures. The kinetics of 110-K phase formation was sluggish. It appears that the presence of lead helps in the formation and/or stabilization of the 110-K phase.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Lewis Research Center, Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (USA)
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6729492
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Journal of Applied Physics; (USA)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 68:3; Journal ID: ISSN 0021-8979
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 75 CONDENSED MATTER PHYSICS, SUPERCONDUCTIVITY AND SUPERFLUIDITY; BISMUTH OXIDES; MELTING; CALCIUM OXIDES; COPPER OXIDES; LEAD OXIDES; STRONTIUM OXIDES; ANNEALING; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; GLASS; HIGH-TC SUPERCONDUCTORS; QUENCHING; TRANSITION TEMPERATURE; ALKALINE EARTH METAL COMPOUNDS; BISMUTH COMPOUNDS; CALCIUM COMPOUNDS; CHALCOGENIDES; COPPER COMPOUNDS; HEAT TREATMENTS; LEAD COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; STRONTIUM COMPOUNDS; SUPERCONDUCTORS; THERMODYNAMIC PROPERTIES; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; 360202* - Ceramics, Cermets, & Refractories- Structure & Phase Studies; 656100 - Condensed Matter Physics- Superconductivity

Citation Formats

Bansal, N P. Superconducting Bi sub 1. 5 Pb sub 0. 5 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1063/1.346709.
Bansal, N P. Superconducting Bi sub 1. 5 Pb sub 0. 5 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization. United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.346709
Bansal, N P. Wed . "Superconducting Bi sub 1. 5 Pb sub 0. 5 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization". United States. https://doi.org/10.1063/1.346709.
@article{osti_6729492,
title = {Superconducting Bi sub 1. 5 Pb sub 0. 5 Sr sub 2 Ca sub 2 Cu sub 3 O sub x ceramics by rapid melt quenching and glass crystallization},
author = {Bansal, N P},
abstractNote = {A glass of nominal Bi{sub 1.5}Pb{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub {ital x}} composition, prepared by rapid quenching of the melt, showed a glass transition temperature of 383 {degree}C, crystallization temperature of 446 {degree}C, melting temperature of 855 {degree}C, and bulk density of 5.69 g/cm{sup 3} in air. The activation energy for crystallization of the glass has been estimated to be 292 kJ/mol from nonisothermal differential scanning calorimetry. On heating in oxygen, the glass showed a slow and continuous weight gain starting at 530 {degree}C which reached a plateau at 820 {degree}C. The weight gained during heating was retained on cooling to ambient conditions indicating an irreversible oxidation step. The influence of annealing conditions on the formation of various phases in the glass has been investigated. The Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 0}Cu{sub 1}O{sub 6} phase crystallized out first followed by formation of other phases at higher temperatures. The high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} phase, isostructural with Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 10}, was not detected below 840 {degree}C, but its fraction increased with the annealing time at 840 {degree}C. A sample annealed at 840 {degree}C for 243 h in air and furnace cooled showed the highest {ital T}{sub {ital c}}({ital R}=0) of 107.2 K and a narrow transition width, {Delta}{ital T}{sub {ital c}} (10%--90%), of 2 K. The high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} phase does not seem to crystallize out directly from the glass but is rather produced at high temperature by reaction between the phases formed at lower temperatures. The kinetics of 110-K phase formation was sluggish. It appears that the presence of lead helps in the formation and/or stabilization of the 110-K phase.},
doi = {10.1063/1.346709},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6729492}, journal = {Journal of Applied Physics; (USA)},
issn = {0021-8979},
number = ,
volume = 68:3,
place = {United States},
year = {1990},
month = {8}
}