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Title: In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS user-friendly

Abstract

As more and more Intelligent Transportation System in-vehicle equipment enters the general consumer market, the authors are about to find out how different design engineers are from ordinary drivers. Driver information systems are being developed and installed in vehicles at an ever-increasing rate. These systems provide information on diverse topics of concern and convenience to the driver, such as routing and navigation, emergency and collision warnings, and a variety of motorists services, or yellow pages functions. Most of these systems are being developed and installed in isolation from each other, with separate means of gathering the information and of displaying it to the driver. The current lack of coordination among on-board systems threatens to create a situation in which different messages on separate displays will be competing with each other for the drivers attention. Urgent messages may go unnoticed, and the number of messages may distract the driver from the most critical task of controlling the vehicle. Thus, without good human factors design and engineering for integrating multiple systems in the vehicle, consumers may find ITS systems confusing and frustrating to use. The current state of the art in human factors research and design for in-vehicle systems has a numbermore » of fundamental gaps. Some of these gaps were identified during the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative Human Factors Technology Workshop, sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, in Troy, Michigan, December 10--11, 1997. One task for workshop participants was to identify needed research areas or topics relating to in-vehicle human factors. The top ten unmet research needs from this workshop are presented. Many of these gaps in human factors research knowledge indicate the need for standardization in the functioning of interfaces for safety-related devices such as collision avoidance systems (CAS) and adaptive cruise controls (ACC). Such standards and guidelines will serve to make the safety-critical aspects of these systems consistent across different manufacturers, thereby reducing the likelihood of driver surprise. A second area to emerge from the Workshop concerns research into techniques for integrating multiple devices in vehicles. This type of research is needed to support the development and validation of standards and guidelines, and is discussed in the second section. The majority of the top ten research types identified in the Workshop fall under the need for a Science of Driving, which is discussed in the last section of this paper.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Financial Management and Controller, Washington, DC (United States); Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
672061
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CP-98317; CONF-980563-
ON: DE98005664; BR: 42WE02004; CNN: Contract 1883E0020 A1; TRN: AHC2DT07%%220
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: ITS-America conference, Detroit, MI (United States), 4-7 May 1998; Other Information: PBD: Apr 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; INFORMATION SYSTEMS; VEHICLES; ROUTING; NAVIGATION; ALARM SYSTEMS; DISPLAY DEVICES; HUMAN FACTORS ENGINEERING; STANDARDIZATION

Citation Formats

Spelt, P.F., and Scott, S. In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS user-friendly. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Spelt, P.F., & Scott, S. In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS user-friendly. United States.
Spelt, P.F., and Scott, S. Wed . "In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS user-friendly". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/672061.
@article{osti_672061,
title = {In-vehicle human factors for integrated multi-function systems: Making ITS user-friendly},
author = {Spelt, P.F. and Scott, S.},
abstractNote = {As more and more Intelligent Transportation System in-vehicle equipment enters the general consumer market, the authors are about to find out how different design engineers are from ordinary drivers. Driver information systems are being developed and installed in vehicles at an ever-increasing rate. These systems provide information on diverse topics of concern and convenience to the driver, such as routing and navigation, emergency and collision warnings, and a variety of motorists services, or yellow pages functions. Most of these systems are being developed and installed in isolation from each other, with separate means of gathering the information and of displaying it to the driver. The current lack of coordination among on-board systems threatens to create a situation in which different messages on separate displays will be competing with each other for the drivers attention. Urgent messages may go unnoticed, and the number of messages may distract the driver from the most critical task of controlling the vehicle. Thus, without good human factors design and engineering for integrating multiple systems in the vehicle, consumers may find ITS systems confusing and frustrating to use. The current state of the art in human factors research and design for in-vehicle systems has a number of fundamental gaps. Some of these gaps were identified during the Intelligent Vehicle Initiative Human Factors Technology Workshop, sponsored by the US Department of Transportation, in Troy, Michigan, December 10--11, 1997. One task for workshop participants was to identify needed research areas or topics relating to in-vehicle human factors. The top ten unmet research needs from this workshop are presented. Many of these gaps in human factors research knowledge indicate the need for standardization in the functioning of interfaces for safety-related devices such as collision avoidance systems (CAS) and adaptive cruise controls (ACC). Such standards and guidelines will serve to make the safety-critical aspects of these systems consistent across different manufacturers, thereby reducing the likelihood of driver surprise. A second area to emerge from the Workshop concerns research into techniques for integrating multiple devices in vehicles. This type of research is needed to support the development and validation of standards and guidelines, and is discussed in the second section. The majority of the top ten research types identified in the Workshop fall under the need for a Science of Driving, which is discussed in the last section of this paper.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {4}
}

Conference:
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