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Title: Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects

Abstract

Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.

Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Energy Information Administration, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels, Washington, DC (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
672037
Report Number(s):
DOE/EIA-0619
ON: DE98005497; NC: NONE; TRN: 99:000602
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: PBD: May 1998
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; NUCLEAR FUELS; MARKET; USA; RUSSIAN FEDERATION; URANIUM; PLUTONIUM; FUEL CYCLE; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; NUCLEAR WEAPONS DISMANTLEMENT; NUCLEAR ENERGY; ECONOMICS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS

Citation Formats

NONE. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects. United States: N. p., 1998. Web. doi:10.2172/672037.
NONE. Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects. United States. doi:10.2172/672037.
NONE. Fri . "Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects". United States. doi:10.2172/672037. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/672037.
@article{osti_672037,
title = {Commercial nuclear fuel from U.S. and Russian surplus defense inventories: Materials, policies, and market effects},
author = {NONE},
abstractNote = {Nuclear materials declared by the US and Russian governments as surplus to defense programs are being converted into fuel for commercial nuclear reactors. This report presents the results of an analysis estimating the market effects that would likely result from current plans to commercialize surplus defense inventories. The analysis focuses on two key issues: (1) the extent by which traditional sources of supply, such as production from uranium mines and enrichment plants, would be displaced by the commercialization of surplus defense inventories or, conversely, would be required in the event of disruptions to planned commercialization, and (2) the future price of uranium considering the potential availability of surplus defense inventories. Finally, the report provides an estimate of the savings in uranium procurement costs that could be realized by US nuclear power generating companies with access to competitively priced uranium supplied from surplus defense inventories.},
doi = {10.2172/672037},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998},
month = {Fri May 01 00:00:00 EDT 1998}
}

Technical Report:

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