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Title: Pulsed high-power beams

Abstract

The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6720266
Report Number(s):
UCRL-98553; CONF-880695-65
ON: DE89001322
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-48
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1. European particle accelerator conference, Rome, Italy, 7 Jun 1988; Other Information: Paper copy only, copy does not permit microfiche production
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; ELECTRON BEAMS; PRODUCTION; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; ACCELERATORS; BEAMS; LEPTON BEAMS; PARTICLE BEAMS 430100* -- Particle Accelerators-- Design, Development, & Operation

Citation Formats

Reginato, L.L., and Birx, D.L.. Pulsed high-power beams. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Reginato, L.L., & Birx, D.L.. Pulsed high-power beams. United States.
Reginato, L.L., and Birx, D.L.. 1988. "Pulsed high-power beams". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6720266,
title = {Pulsed high-power beams},
author = {Reginato, L.L. and Birx, D.L.},
abstractNote = {The marriage of induction linac technology with nonlinear magnetic modulators has produced some unique capabilities. It is now possible to produce short-pulse electron beams with average currents measured in amperes, at gradients approaching 1-MeV/m, and with power efficiencies exceeding 50%. A 70-Mev, 3-kA induction accelerator (ETA II) constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory incorporates the pulse technology concepts that have evolved over the past several years. The ETA II is a linear induction accelerator and provides a test facility for demonstration of the high-average-power components and high-brightness sources used in such accelerators. The pulse drive for the accelerator is based on state-of-the-art magnetic pulse compressors with very high peak-power capability, repetition rates exceeding 1 kHz, and excellent reliability. 6 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 6
}

Conference:
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  • Enhanced tribological properties have been observed after treatment with pulsed high power ion beams, which results in rapid melting and resolidification of the surface. The authors have treated and tested 440C martensitic stainless steel (Fe-17 Cr-1 C). Ti and Al samples were sputter coated and ion beam treated to produce surface alloying. The samples were treated at the RHEPP-I facility at Sandia National Laboratories (0.5 MV, 0.5--1 {micro}s at sample location, <10 J/cm{sup 2}, 1--5 {micro}m ion range). They have observed a reduction in size of second phase particles and other microstructural changes in 440C steel. The hardness of treatedmore » 440C increases with ion beam fluence and a maximum hardness increase of a factor of 5 is obtained. Low wear rates are observed in wear tested of treated 440C steel. Surface alloyed Ti-Pt layers show improvements in hardness up to a factor of 3 over untreated Ti, and surface alloys of Al-Si result in a hardness increase of a factor of two over untreated Al. Both surface alloys show increased durability in wear testing. Rutherford Backscattering (RBS) measurements show overlayer mixing to the depth of the melted layer. X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and TEM confirm the existence of metastable states within the treated layer. Treated layer depths have been measured from 1--10 {micro}m.« less
  • This paper presents a short review of the published work done in the USA, USSR, and France on the production of intense H/sup -/-ion beams in pulsed, high-power magnetically insulated lines and diodes. The production of H/sup -/ ions is discussed and the application of repetitive, pulsed intense H/sup -/-ion beams to magnetic and inertial-confinement fusion is considered.
  • The high peak power, single-pulse technology developed for government programs during the mid-60`s through the mid-80`s is being adapted for use in continuously operating, high average power commercial materials processing applications. A new thermal surface treatment technology, called ion beam surface treatment (BEST), uses repetitive high energy (kJ`s per pulse), pulsed ({le}500 ns) ion beams to directly deposit energy in the top 1-20 micrometers of the surface of any material. A high average power IBEST processing system is made up of a magnetic pulse compressor (MPC) a magnetically confined anode plasma (MAP) ion beam source, an ion beam transport system,more » a materials handling system and various cooling and reset systems. System issues such as cost, reliability, size, maintainability, and design-for-manufacturability that were of secondary importance behind specific performance requirements for the earlier government applications are now the primary issues in proposed industrial systems. Research systems are now obtaining lifetime, reliability, and design-rules information for high average power short-pulse components. Beam sources are being developed that are suitable for industrial systems operating at 5-100 kW, 0.1-2.0 MeV, and {le}500 ns pulse widths. Capitol equipment costs, operating and financing costs, and sizing issues are being weighed against specific economic benefits obtained in short-pulse ion beam treatment of selected products. Dependable equipment designers and suppliers, facility integrator, and servicing organizations are being combined with development teams from end-user companies for final technology integration into major manufacturing facilities. An BEST prototype commercial system is being designed and fabricated by QM Technologies for initial operation in mid-1997.« less