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Title: Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels

Abstract

Two urea-free agarose gel protocols that resolve the six individual strands of bacteriophage phi 6 dsRNA were developed and used to analyze phage RNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Citrate gels separate strands of the large and medium chromosomes while Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) gels resolve the medium and small dsRNA segments. Minus strands migrate faster than plus strands on citrate gels but are retarded on TBE gels. A study of electrophoretic conditions showed that pH affects strand resolution on citrate gels, and that voltage gradient, agarose concentration, and ethidium bromide significantly alter strand migration on TBE gels. Analysis of native phi 6 RNA synthesized in vivo and in vitro showed that the large and medium message RNAs comigrate with the corresponding plus strands of denatured virion dsRNA. The small messenger RNA is exceptional. Native small mRNA was detected as three isoconformers in vivo and in vitro. The isoconformers were converted by heat denaturation to a single RNA species that comigrates with the virion s+ strand. Minus strands labeled in vivo were detected only after heat denaturation. Minus strand synthesis was detected also in heat-denatured samples from in vitro phi 6 nucleocapsid RNA polymerase reactions at pH values suboptimal for transcription.

Authors:
;  [1]
  1. (Univ. of Chicago, IL (USA))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6718775
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Virology; (USA); Journal Volume: 177:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; MESSENGER-RNA; BIOSYNTHESIS; RNA; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; BACTERIOPHAGES; CHROMOSOMES; ELECTROPHORESIS; IN VITRO; IN VIVO; MOLECULAR STRUCTURE; PHOSPHORUS ISOTOPES; PLASMIDS; PSEUDOMONAS; TRANSCRIPTION; BACTERIA; CELL CONSTITUENTS; ISOTOPES; MICROORGANISMS; NUCLEIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PARASITES; SYNTHESIS; VIRUSES 550201* -- Biochemistry-- Tracer Techniques

Citation Formats

Pagratis, N., and Revel, H.R. Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels. United States: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1016/0042-6822(90)90480-F.
Pagratis, N., & Revel, H.R. Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels. United States. doi:10.1016/0042-6822(90)90480-F.
Pagratis, N., and Revel, H.R. 1990. "Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels". United States. doi:10.1016/0042-6822(90)90480-F.
@article{osti_6718775,
title = {Detection of bacteriophage phi 6 minus-strand RNA and novel mRNA isoconformers synthesized in vivo and in vitro, by strand-separating agarose gels},
author = {Pagratis, N. and Revel, H.R.},
abstractNote = {Two urea-free agarose gel protocols that resolve the six individual strands of bacteriophage phi 6 dsRNA were developed and used to analyze phage RNA synthesis in vivo and in vitro. Citrate gels separate strands of the large and medium chromosomes while Tris-borate-EDTA (TBE) gels resolve the medium and small dsRNA segments. Minus strands migrate faster than plus strands on citrate gels but are retarded on TBE gels. A study of electrophoretic conditions showed that pH affects strand resolution on citrate gels, and that voltage gradient, agarose concentration, and ethidium bromide significantly alter strand migration on TBE gels. Analysis of native phi 6 RNA synthesized in vivo and in vitro showed that the large and medium message RNAs comigrate with the corresponding plus strands of denatured virion dsRNA. The small messenger RNA is exceptional. Native small mRNA was detected as three isoconformers in vivo and in vitro. The isoconformers were converted by heat denaturation to a single RNA species that comigrates with the virion s+ strand. Minus strands labeled in vivo were detected only after heat denaturation. Minus strand synthesis was detected also in heat-denatured samples from in vitro phi 6 nucleocapsid RNA polymerase reactions at pH values suboptimal for transcription.},
doi = {10.1016/0042-6822(90)90480-F},
journal = {Virology; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 177:1,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 7
}
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