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Title: Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir

Abstract

The purpose was to determine if there was potential for human health risks from consumption of reservoir fish or if selected toxic substances might be impacting reservoir biota. Fillets from catfish (channel and blue) and largemouth bass were analyzed for the first purpose and whole gizzard shad, catfish livers, and turtle livers and fat were analyzed for the second. Results indicate largemouth bass should be safe for consumption based on low levels of tested contaminants. However, three of sixteen catfish samples contained PCB levels above the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tolerance of 2.0 ..mu..g/g, and seven others contained levels sufficiently close to that value to warrant concern. DDT and its metabolites and selected metals were low in catfish except for chromium, nickel, and mercury in selected cases. Analyses on all sample types (those referenced above plus catfish livers and turtle fat and livers) indicated levels of metals were generally low and probably not individually impacting reservoir biota.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Tennessee Valley Authority, Chattanooga (USA). Office of Natural Resources and Economic Development
OSTI Identifier:
6711153
Report Number(s):
TVA/ONRED/AWR-87/18
ON: DE87900613
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FISHES; CONTAMINATION; TURTLES; ALABAMA; CHLORINATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HEALTH HAZARDS; METALS; PESTICIDES; QUANTITY RATIO; WATER RESERVOIRS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; AROMATICS; ELEMENTS; FEDERAL REGION IV; HALOGENATED AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS; HAZARDS; NORTH AMERICA; ORGANIC CHLORINE COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; REPTILES; SURFACE WATERS; USA; VERTEBRATES 520200* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Dycus, D.L., and Lowery, D.R.. Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir. United States: N. p., 1986. Web.
Dycus, D.L., & Lowery, D.R.. Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir. United States.
Dycus, D.L., and Lowery, D.R.. 1986. "Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6711153,
title = {Technical report series: Concentrations of PCBs, DDTr, and selected metals in biota from Guntersville Reservoir},
author = {Dycus, D.L. and Lowery, D.R.},
abstractNote = {The purpose was to determine if there was potential for human health risks from consumption of reservoir fish or if selected toxic substances might be impacting reservoir biota. Fillets from catfish (channel and blue) and largemouth bass were analyzed for the first purpose and whole gizzard shad, catfish livers, and turtle livers and fat were analyzed for the second. Results indicate largemouth bass should be safe for consumption based on low levels of tested contaminants. However, three of sixteen catfish samples contained PCB levels above the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tolerance of 2.0 ..mu..g/g, and seven others contained levels sufficiently close to that value to warrant concern. DDT and its metabolites and selected metals were low in catfish except for chromium, nickel, and mercury in selected cases. Analyses on all sample types (those referenced above plus catfish livers and turtle fat and livers) indicated levels of metals were generally low and probably not individually impacting reservoir biota.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1986,
month =
}

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  • After finding polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) levels above 2.0 ..mu..g/g in catfish from Wilson Reservoir in autumn 1984, the Tennessee Valley Authority decided to sample catfish from Wheeler Reservoir (upstream of Wilson) and Pickwick Reservoir (downstream of Wilson). These samples were collected in August and September 1985 and all had detectable levels of PCBs, some near or above 2.0 ..mu..g/g. Wheeler Reservoir catfish had highest levels in upstream reaches (up to 2.6 ..mu..g/g in one composite sample), decreasing progressively downstream (<0.5 ..mu..g/g in several composite samples). Pickwick Reservoir (downstream of Wilson) showed a similar distribution with highest PCBs levels (up tomore » 2.3 ..mu..g/g) at the upstream location and levels decreasing in a downstream direction (lowest level 0.11 ..mu..g/g). These fish were also analyzed for DDTr (DDT and metabolites) and selected metals. In Wheeler Reservoir DDTr levels were higher in the upper reaches due to the known DDT contamination there. Levels were generally low in Pickwick Reservoir except at the uppermost location where one sample had 7.4 ..mu..g/g.« less
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