skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties]

Abstract

This community profile provides an introduction to the ecology of the communities living on and around rubble structures in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). The most prominent rubble structures in the bight are jetties built at the entrances to major harbors. After an initial discussion of the various kinds of rubble structures and physical factors that affect the organisms associated with them, the major portion of the text is devoted to the ecology of rubble structure habitats. Community composition, distribution, seasonality, and the recruitment patterns of the major groups of organisms are described. The major physical and biological factors affecting the organization of intertidal, sunlit subtidal, and shaded subtidal communities are presented and the potential effects of complex interactions in structuring these communities are evaluated. The profile concludes with a general review of the effects of rubble structures on nearshore sediment dynamics and shoreline evolution. 295 refs., 33 figs., 4 tabs.

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Fish and Wildlife Service, Washington, DC (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6682961
Report Number(s):
BR-85(7.20)
ON: TI89002472
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BASELINE ECOLOGY; EVALUATION; ROCKS; BIOLOGICAL FOULING; SEA BED; AGE DEPENDENCE; ALGAE; BIOLOGICAL VARIABILITY; COASTAL WATERS; COMMUNITIES; ESTUARIES; FISHERIES; FLORIDA; GEORGIA; NORTH CAROLINA; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; SEA URCHINS; SEAWEEDS; SOUTH ATLANTIC BIGHT; SOUTH CAROLINA; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; ATLANTIC OCEAN; ECHINODERMS; ECOLOGY; FEDERAL REGION IV; FOULING; INVERTEBRATES; NORTH AMERICA; PLANTS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; USA 520100* -- Environment, Aquatic-- Basic Studies-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Hay, M.E., and Sutherland, J.P. The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties]. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Hay, M.E., & Sutherland, J.P. The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties]. United States.
Hay, M.E., and Sutherland, J.P. 1988. "The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties]". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6682961,
title = {The ecology of rubble structures of the South Atlantic Bight: A community profile. [Jetties]},
author = {Hay, M.E. and Sutherland, J.P.},
abstractNote = {This community profile provides an introduction to the ecology of the communities living on and around rubble structures in the South Atlantic Bight (Cape Hatteras to Cape Canaveral). The most prominent rubble structures in the bight are jetties built at the entrances to major harbors. After an initial discussion of the various kinds of rubble structures and physical factors that affect the organisms associated with them, the major portion of the text is devoted to the ecology of rubble structure habitats. Community composition, distribution, seasonality, and the recruitment patterns of the major groups of organisms are described. The major physical and biological factors affecting the organization of intertidal, sunlit subtidal, and shaded subtidal communities are presented and the potential effects of complex interactions in structuring these communities are evaluated. The profile concludes with a general review of the effects of rubble structures on nearshore sediment dynamics and shoreline evolution. 295 refs., 33 figs., 4 tabs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • Eelgrass, Zostera marina, dominates the ecologically important but fragile seagrass communities along the east coast of the United States from North Carolina to Nova Scotia. Grasslike leaves and an extensive root and rhizome system enable eelgrass to exist in a shallow aquatic environment subject to waves, tides, and shifting sediments. Eelgrass meadows are highly productive, frequently rivaling agricultural croplands. They provide shelter and a rich variety of primary and secondary food resources, and form a nursery habitat for the life history stages of numerous fishery organisms. The leaves absorb and release nutrients, provide surfaces for attachment, reduce water current velocity,more » turbulence and scour, and promote accumulation of detritus. Rhizomes provide protection for benthic infauna and enhance sediment stability. Roots absorb and release nutrients to interstitial waters. Because of their shallow, subtidal existence, seagrasses are susceptible to perturbations of both the water column and sediments. Eelgrass meadows are impacted by dredging and filling, some commercial fishery harvest techniques, modification of normal temperature and salinity regimes, and addition of chemical wastes. Techniques have been developed to successfully restore eelgrass habitats, but a holistic approach to planning research and environmentally-related decisions is needed to avoid cumulative environmental impacts on these vital nursery areas. 64 figures, 16 tables.« less
  • Maritime forests dominated by broadleaved evergreen trees and shrubs occur in a discontinuous narrow band along the barrier islands and on the adjacent mainland from North Carolina to Florida. The flora and fauna of maritime forests typically consist of a distinctive subset of the regional biota that is particularly well adapted to survive the elevated salt content, limited availability of fresh water, soil erosion and dune migration, periodic seawater inundation, and wind damage associated with oceanic storms. Recent recognition of the relatively greater physical stability of maritime forests compared to the beachfront has resulted in intensified urban development within them.more » Maritime forests across the range have been increasingly impaired by clearing for roads and parking lots and fragmented by subdivision development.« less
  • A detailed description is given of the community structure and ecosystem processes of the mangrove forests of south Florida. This description is based upon a compilation of data and hypotheses from published and unpublished sources. Information covered ranges from details of mangrove distribution, primary production, and diseases to asepcts of reproduction, biomass partitioning, and adaptations to stress. Mangrove ecosystems are considered in terms of zonation, succession, litter fall and decomposition, carbon export, and energy flow. Most of the components of mangrove communities are cataloged and discussed; these include mircoorganisms, plants other than mangroves, invertebrates, fishes, reptiles, amphibians, birds, and mammals.more » Finally, two sections summarize the value of mangrove ecosystems to man and present ways to manage this type of habitat. It is concluded that mangrove forests, which cover between 430,000 and 500,000 acres (174,000 to 202,000 ha) in Florida, are a resource of great value and should be protected and preserved wherever possible.« less
  • An overview of coral reef research in southern Florida is provided as a prelude to a genuine description of the coral reef ecosystem in the Florida Keys and surrounding environments. Coral reef community types, reef benthos, plankton and reef fish are given specific treatment. Coral reef ecology and management are described. 27 figs., 31 tabs.
  • A detailed description is given of the community structure and ecosystem processes of the seagrass ecosystems of south Florida. This description is based upon a compilation of information from numerous published and unpublished sources. The material covered includes distribution, systematics, physiology, and growth of the plants, as well as succession and community development. The role of seagrass ecosystems in providing both food and shelter for juveniles as well as foraging grounds for larger organisms is treated in detail. Emphasis is given to the functional role of seagrass communities in the overall coastal marine system. The final section considers the impactsmore » of human development on seagrass ecosystems and their value to both man and the natural system. Because seagrass systems are fully submerged and less visually obvious, recognition of their value as a natural resource has been slower than that of the emergent coastal communities. They must, however, be treated as a valuable natural resource and preserved from further degradation.« less