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Title: Hybrid systems process mixed wastes

Abstract

Some technologies, developed recently in Europe, combine several processes to separate and reuse materials from solid waste. These plants have in common, generally, that they are reasonably small, have a composting component for the organic portion, and often have a refuse-derived fuel component for combustible waste. Many European communities also have very effective drop-off center programs for recyclables such as bottles and cans. By maintaining the integrity of several different fractions of the waste, there is a less to landfill and less to burn. The importance of these hybrid systems is that they introduce in one plant an approach that encompasses the key concept of today's solid waste planning; recover as much as possible and landfill as little as possible. The plants also introduce various risks, particularly of finding secure markets. There are a number of companies offering various combinations of materials recovery, composting, and waste combustion. Four examples are included: multiple materials recovery and refuse-derived fuel production in Eden Prairie, Minnesota; multiple materials recovery, composting and refuse-derived fuel production in Perugia, Italy; composting, refuse-derived fuel, and gasification in Tolmezzo, Italy; and a front-end system on a mass burning waste-to-energy plant in Neuchatel, Switzerland.

Authors:
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6671779
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BioCycle; (USA); Journal Volume: 30:10
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; REFUSE DERIVED FUELS; PRODUCTION; SOLID WASTES; RECYCLING; ITALY; MATERIALS RECOVERY; MINNESOTA; MUNICIPAL WASTES; SANITARY LANDFILLS; SWITZERLAND; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE PROCESSING PLANTS; EUROPE; FEDERAL REGION V; FUELS; INDUSTRIAL PLANTS; MANAGEMENT; NORTH AMERICA; PROCESSING; RECOVERY; USA; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WASTE PROCESSING; WASTES; WESTERN EUROPE 320604* -- Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization-- Municipalities & Community Systems-- Municipal Waste Management-- (1980-); 092000 -- Biomass Fuels-- Combustion-- (1990-)

Citation Formats

Chertow, M.R. Hybrid systems process mixed wastes. United States: N. p., 1989. Web.
Chertow, M.R. Hybrid systems process mixed wastes. United States.
Chertow, M.R. 1989. "Hybrid systems process mixed wastes". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6671779,
title = {Hybrid systems process mixed wastes},
author = {Chertow, M.R.},
abstractNote = {Some technologies, developed recently in Europe, combine several processes to separate and reuse materials from solid waste. These plants have in common, generally, that they are reasonably small, have a composting component for the organic portion, and often have a refuse-derived fuel component for combustible waste. Many European communities also have very effective drop-off center programs for recyclables such as bottles and cans. By maintaining the integrity of several different fractions of the waste, there is a less to landfill and less to burn. The importance of these hybrid systems is that they introduce in one plant an approach that encompasses the key concept of today's solid waste planning; recover as much as possible and landfill as little as possible. The plants also introduce various risks, particularly of finding secure markets. There are a number of companies offering various combinations of materials recovery, composting, and waste combustion. Four examples are included: multiple materials recovery and refuse-derived fuel production in Eden Prairie, Minnesota; multiple materials recovery, composting and refuse-derived fuel production in Perugia, Italy; composting, refuse-derived fuel, and gasification in Tolmezzo, Italy; and a front-end system on a mass burning waste-to-energy plant in Neuchatel, Switzerland.},
doi = {},
journal = {BioCycle; (USA)},
number = ,
volume = 30:10,
place = {United States},
year = 1989,
month =
}
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