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Title: New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations

Abstract

The use of teleoperated robotic devices for law enforcement operations has risen dramatically in recent years. The typical device is a portable, teleoperated vehicle with a manipulator. The availability of reliable, affordable equipment and emphasis on personnel safety are some of the primary driving forces. The primary use of these robots is for investigation and handling of explosive devices. The Kentucky State Police (KSP) have been using a remote vehicle since December 1988.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (Kentucky State Police, Frankfort (United States))
Publication Date:
OSTI Identifier:
6668615
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6668615
Report Number(s):
CONF-921102--
Journal ID: ISSN 0003-018X; CODEN: TANSAO
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States); Journal Volume: 66; Conference: Joint American Nuclear Society (ANS)/European Nuclear Society (ENS) international meeting on fifty years of controlled nuclear chain reaction: past, present, and future, Chicago, IL (United States), 15-20 Nov 1992
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; VEHICLES; REMOTE CONTROL; ENFORCEMENT; EXPLOSIVES; MANIPULATORS; REMOTE VIEWING EQUIPMENT; ROBOTS; CONTROL; EQUIPMENT; LABORATORY EQUIPMENT; MATERIALS HANDLING EQUIPMENT; REMOTE HANDLING EQUIPMENT 420200* -- Engineering-- Facilities, Equipment, & Techniques

Citation Formats

Henderson, L. New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations. United States: N. p., 1992. Web.
Henderson, L. New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations. United States.
Henderson, L. Wed . "New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6668615,
title = {New uses of remote vehicles for law enforcement operations},
author = {Henderson, L.},
abstractNote = {The use of teleoperated robotic devices for law enforcement operations has risen dramatically in recent years. The typical device is a portable, teleoperated vehicle with a manipulator. The availability of reliable, affordable equipment and emphasis on personnel safety are some of the primary driving forces. The primary use of these robots is for investigation and handling of explosive devices. The Kentucky State Police (KSP) have been using a remote vehicle since December 1988.},
doi = {},
journal = {Transactions of the American Nuclear Society; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 66,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992},
month = {Wed Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1992}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

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