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Title: CT evaluation of cystic lymphangiomas of the mediastinum

Abstract

Two cases of cystic mediastinal lymphangioma are reported, one involving a 12-year-old boy and the other a 53-year-old man. In both cases a mediastinal mass was evident on plain chest radiographs, while CT scans demonstrated a well-circumscribed lesion of low attenuation molding to the mediastinal contours and enveloping the great vessels, suggesting the diagnosis. The display of the precise extent of the lesion in relation to the surrounding structures was helpful in planning surgery.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
St. Louis Univ. Hospitals, MO
OSTI Identifier:
6655799
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiology; (United States); Journal Volume: 144:4
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; ANGIOMAS; DIAGNOSIS; MEDIASTINUM; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; PLANNING; SURGERY; BODY; BODY AREAS; CHEST; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; MEDICINE; NEOPLASMS; TOMOGRAPHY 550602* -- Medicine-- External Radiation in Diagnostics-- (1980-)

Citation Formats

Pilla, T.J., Wolverson, M.K., Sundaram, M., Heiberg. E., and Shields, J.B. CT evaluation of cystic lymphangiomas of the mediastinum. United States: N. p., 1982. Web. doi:10.1148/radiology.144.4.7111735.
Pilla, T.J., Wolverson, M.K., Sundaram, M., Heiberg. E., & Shields, J.B. CT evaluation of cystic lymphangiomas of the mediastinum. United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.144.4.7111735.
Pilla, T.J., Wolverson, M.K., Sundaram, M., Heiberg. E., and Shields, J.B. 1982. "CT evaluation of cystic lymphangiomas of the mediastinum". United States. doi:10.1148/radiology.144.4.7111735.
@article{osti_6655799,
title = {CT evaluation of cystic lymphangiomas of the mediastinum},
author = {Pilla, T.J. and Wolverson, M.K. and Sundaram, M. and Heiberg. E. and Shields, J.B.},
abstractNote = {Two cases of cystic mediastinal lymphangioma are reported, one involving a 12-year-old boy and the other a 53-year-old man. In both cases a mediastinal mass was evident on plain chest radiographs, while CT scans demonstrated a well-circumscribed lesion of low attenuation molding to the mediastinal contours and enveloping the great vessels, suggesting the diagnosis. The display of the precise extent of the lesion in relation to the surrounding structures was helpful in planning surgery.},
doi = {10.1148/radiology.144.4.7111735},
journal = {Radiology; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 144:4,
place = {United States},
year = 1982,
month = 9
}
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  • PurposePrior to radioembolization (RE) of hepatic tumors, many centers prophylactically occlude the cystic artery (CA) during evaluation angiography (EVA) to prevent radiation-induced cholecystitis. There is no conclusive evidence for the protective effect of CA embolization and it bears the risk of inducing ischemic cholecystitis. The aim of this study is to evaluate the justification for CA embolization by comparing clinical and morphologic imaging parameters between patients undergoing coil occlusion of the cystic artery (COCA) and those with uncoiled CA (UCCA).Materials and MethodsRetrospective comparison of 37 patients with UCCA versus 68 patients with COCA in terms of clinical findings (CRP, leukocytemore » count, body temperature, upper abdominal pain) and morphologic imaging parameters associated with cholecystitis (gallbladder (GB) wall thickness, free fluid in GB bed, bremsstrahlung SPECT) after EVA, after RE, and at 6-week follow-up.ResultsAt none of the 3 time points (EVA, RE, 6-week follow-up) was there any significant difference in CRP, leukocyte count, body temperature, or upper abdominal pain between the UCCA and COCA group. There was also no significant difference between the two groups with regard to GB wall thickness, fluid in the GB bed, and bremsstrahlung in SPECT. One patient of the UCCA group and two patients of the COCA developed cholecystitis requiring treatment.ConclusionComparison of clinical and imaging findings between patients with and without CA embolization prior to RE identified no predictors of radiogenic or ischemic cholecystitis after RE. Our study provides no evidence for a benefit of prophylactic CA embolization before RE.« less