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Title: Los Alamos Science: Number 16

Abstract

It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. (ed.)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6642551
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-88-1000
ON: DE89004004
DOE Contract Number:
W-7405-ENG-36
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions of this document are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; LOS ALAMOS; MEETINGS; BIOLOGICAL EXTINCTION; COSMOLOGY; NEUROLOGY; PALEONTOLOGY; RADIO TELESCOPES; VISION; ANTENNAS; ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT; ELECTRONIC EQUIPMENT; EQUIPMENT; FEDERAL REGION VI; MEDICINE; NEW MEXICO; NORTH AMERICA; RADIO EQUIPMENT; TELESCOPES; USA 990000* -- General & Miscellaneous

Citation Formats

Cooper, N.G. Los Alamos Science: Number 16. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Cooper, N.G. Los Alamos Science: Number 16. United States.
Cooper, N.G. 1988. "Los Alamos Science: Number 16". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6642551,
title = {Los Alamos Science: Number 16},
author = {Cooper, N.G.},
abstractNote = {It was an unusually stimulating day and a half at Los Alamos when two Nobel Laureates in physiology, a leading paleontologist, and a leading bio-astrophysicist came together to discuss ''Unsolved Problems in the Science of Life,'' the topic of the second in a series of special meetings sponsored by the Fellows of the Laboratory. Just like the first one on ''Creativity in Science,'' this colloquium took us into a broader arena of ideas and viewpoints than is our usual daily fare. To contemplate the evolution and mysteries of intelligent life from the speakers' diverse points of view at one time, in one place was indeed a rare experience.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:
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