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Title: Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California

Abstract

Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the mostmore » favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.« less

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
California State Dept. of Conservation, Sacramento (USA). Div. of Mines and Geology
OSTI Identifier:
6636810
Report Number(s):
DOE/SF/10855-3
ON: DE83006192
DOE Contract Number:
FG03-80SF10855
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Portions are illegible in microfiche products
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; 02 PETROLEUM; CALIFORNIA; GEOTHERMAL RESOURCES; THERMAL WATERS; RESOURCE ASSESSMENT; OIL FIELDS; GEOTHERMAL GRADIENTS; HEAT EXCHANGERS; MAPS; SALINITY; WATER QUALITY; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; FEDERAL REGION IX; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; MINERAL RESOURCES; NORTH AMERICA; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; RESOURCES; TEMPERATURE GRADIENTS; USA Geothermal Legacy 150301* -- Geothermal Exploration & Exploration Technology-- Geophysical Techniques & Surveys; 150101 -- Geothermal Energy-- Resources & Availability-- USA-- (-1989); 020500 -- Petroleum-- Products & By-Products

Citation Formats

Higgins, C.T.. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California. United States: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.2172/6636810.
Higgins, C.T.. Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California. United States. doi:10.2172/6636810.
Higgins, C.T.. 1981. "Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California". United States. doi:10.2172/6636810. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6636810.
@article{osti_6636810,
title = {Reconnaissance of geothermal resources of Los Angeles County, California},
author = {Higgins, C.T.},
abstractNote = {Thermal waters produced from large oil fields are currently the most important geothermal resources in Los Angeles County. Otherwise, the County does not appear to have any large, near-surface geothermal resources. The oil fields produce thermal water because of both the moderate depths of production and normal to above-normal geothermal gradients. Gradients are about 3.0-3.5/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Ventura Basin and range from that up to about 5.5-6.0/sup 0/C/100 meters in the Los Angeles Basin. The hottest fields in the County are west of the Newport-Inglewood Structural Zone. The Los Angeles Basin has substantially more potential for uses of heat from oil fields than does the Ventura Basin because of its large fields and dense urban development. Produced fluid temperatures there range from ambient air to boiling, but most are in the 100-150/sup 0/F range. Daily water production ranges from only a few barrels at some fields to over a million barrels at Wilmington Oil Field; nearly all fields produce less than 50,000 barrels/day. Water salinity generally ranges from about 15,000-35,000 mg/liter NaCl. Fields with the most promise as sources of heat for outside applications are Wilmington, Torrance, Venice Beach, and Lawndale. The centralized treatment facilities are the most favorable sites for extraction of heat within the oil fields. Because of the poor water quality heat exchangers will likely be required rather than direct circulation of the field water to users. The best sites for applications are commercial-industrial areas and possibly institutional structures occupied by large numbers of people.},
doi = {10.2172/6636810},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1981,
month = 1
}

Technical Report:

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