skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Laboratory-scale pressure-swing adsorption parametric study: R113 on BPL carbon. Final report, October 1992-September 1993

Abstract

The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is investigating the pressure-wing adsorption (PSA) as a potential advanced technology approach for regenerable collective protection in military vehicles required to operate in chemical/biological warfare theaters. Experiments to test the filtration performance of a laboratory-scale PSA system have been performed by adding 1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane (R113) to feed air-stream and monitoring the purge-and product-stream, R113 concentrations, as the challenge proceeds. In addition, in-bed probes have been utilized to monitor the R113 concentration at 5 cm intervals along the length of the PSA bed during each experiment. The data resulting from these experiments have been used to derive PSA performance-prediction models that will assist in the design and validation of PSA-based collective protection systems for various military applications.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
6613248
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6613248
Report Number(s):
AD-A-286384/3/XAB; ERDEC-TR--196
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
45 MILITARY TECHNOLOGY, WEAPONRY, AND NATIONAL DEFENSE; BIOLOGICAL WARFARE AGENTS; ADSORPTION; EQUIPMENT PROTECTION DEVICES; CHEMICAL WARFARE AGENTS; PROGRESS REPORT; DOCUMENT TYPES; SORPTION; WEAPONS 450600* -- Military Technology, Weaponry, & National Defense-- Chemical & Biological-- (1990)

Citation Formats

Mahle, J.J., Buettner, L.C., Tevault, D.E., Friday, D.K., and Brady, A.B. Laboratory-scale pressure-swing adsorption parametric study: R113 on BPL carbon. Final report, October 1992-September 1993. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Mahle, J.J., Buettner, L.C., Tevault, D.E., Friday, D.K., & Brady, A.B. Laboratory-scale pressure-swing adsorption parametric study: R113 on BPL carbon. Final report, October 1992-September 1993. United States.
Mahle, J.J., Buettner, L.C., Tevault, D.E., Friday, D.K., and Brady, A.B. Mon . "Laboratory-scale pressure-swing adsorption parametric study: R113 on BPL carbon. Final report, October 1992-September 1993". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6613248,
title = {Laboratory-scale pressure-swing adsorption parametric study: R113 on BPL carbon. Final report, October 1992-September 1993},
author = {Mahle, J.J. and Buettner, L.C. and Tevault, D.E. and Friday, D.K. and Brady, A.B.},
abstractNote = {The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is investigating the pressure-wing adsorption (PSA) as a potential advanced technology approach for regenerable collective protection in military vehicles required to operate in chemical/biological warfare theaters. Experiments to test the filtration performance of a laboratory-scale PSA system have been performed by adding 1,1,2-trifluoro-1,2,2-trichloroethane (R113) to feed air-stream and monitoring the purge-and product-stream, R113 concentrations, as the challenge proceeds. In addition, in-bed probes have been utilized to monitor the R113 concentration at 5 cm intervals along the length of the PSA bed during each experiment. The data resulting from these experiments have been used to derive PSA performance-prediction models that will assist in the design and validation of PSA-based collective protection systems for various military applications.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 1994}
}

Technical Report:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that may hold this item. Keep in mind that many technical reports are not cataloged in WorldCat.

Save / Share:
  • The U.S. Army Edgewood Research, Development and Engineering Center is Currently measuring adsorption phase equilibrium data for a variety of chemical warfare agents and their surrogates on a variety of adsorbent materials to correlate physical properties to filtration/separation efficiencies of each vapor on each adsorbent. Adsorption phase equilibrium data are required to evaluate any adsorption-based gas separation process. This report describes the apparatus developed in-house to measure adsorption phase equilibrium data with emphasis on the automated data acquisition devices that allow the tedious intervention. Preliminary results confirm that the results obtained using the new automated isotherms measurement system compare favorablymore » with data measured in earlier studies using manually-controlled systems.« less
  • Rapid pressure swing absorption-separation of a gas mixture via nondispersive contacting of the feed gas with a nonwetting absorbent liquid in a microporous hydrophobic hollow fiber has been demonstrated. The feed gas purification capability of such a process using reactive absorbents is extraordinary. Both CO and CO{sub 2} were demonstrated to be removed from gas mixtures with high efficiency.
  • The aim of this research project is to investigate mechanisms underlying adsorption and surface precipitation of flooding surfactants on reservoir minerals. Effects of surfactant structure, surfactant combinations, various inorganic and polymeric species, and solids mineralogy will be determined. A multi-pronged approach consisting of micro & nano spectroscopy, microcalorimetry, electrokinetics, surface tension and wettability; is used in this study. The results obtained should help in controlling surfactant loss in chemical flooding and in developing optimum structures and conditions for efficient chemical flooding processes. During the first year of this three year contract, adsorption of single surfactants and select surfactant mixtures wasmore » studied at the solid-liquid and gas-liquid interfaces. Surfactants studied include alkyl xylene sulfonates, polyethoxylated alkyl phenols, octaethylene glycol mono n-decyl ether, and tetradecyl trimethyl ammonium chloride. Adsorption of surfactant mixtures of varying composition was also investigated. The microstructure of the adsorbed layer was characterized using fluorescence spectroscopy. Changes interfacial properties such as wettability, electrokinetics and stability of reservoir minerals were correlated with the amount of reagent adsorbed. Strong effects of the structure of the surfactant and position of functional groups were revealed.« less
  • This report presents a review of the activities of the Toxic Hazards Research Unit (THRU) for the period 0 1 October 1992 through 30 September 1993. The THRU conducts descriptive, mechanistic, and predictive toxicology research and toxicological risk assessments to provide data to predict health hazards and to assess health risks associated with human exposure to chemicals and materials associated with military systems and operational environments. The report includes summaries of ongoing or completed research activities for the individual toxicology research requirements of the U.S. Air Force, Army, and Navy; highlights of the research support elements and conference activities ofmore » the THRU; and appendices that describe the THRU organization and its publications and presentations. The majority of the report describes the progress attained in toxicological studies on a wide variety of chemicals and materials to include tetrachloroethylene, iodotrifluoromethane, ammonium dinitramide, HCFC- 123, trichloroethylene, toluene, liquid propellant formulation 1846, vinyl chloride and trichloroethylene mixture, methylene chloride, MIL-H-19457C hydraulic fluid, acrolein and acrolein/Syloid 244 mixture, 1 ,3,3-trinitroazetidine, and 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene. The THRU also conducted research on lactational transfer and dermal absorption of chemicals, on toxicological risk assessment methods, and evaluated statistical methods for assessing military populations as a subgroup of the public at-large.« less
  • The main advantage of the project is that it allowed PTI to gain knowledge and experience about the proper approach, methods and hardware required to properly optimize and control column flotation performance. Many operational problems were incurred during the project, some of that PTI was able to solve during the project and other that must be overcome as the technology is further developed and commercialized. The key operating problems experienced with the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column that must be further researched and overcome include: (1)The low concentrate solids content which limited the throughput capacity of the column, due to high frothmore » washing requirements. The low concentrate solids content also lead to difficulty obtaining accurate On-Line Monitor measurements, due to the poor measurement sensitivity obtained with low solids content samples (particularly less than 5.0 wt %). (2) The higher-than-anticipated reagent dosages that undoubtedly contributed to the low solids content listed above, and also caused foaming problems within PTI`s On-Line Monitor. A defoaming reagent addition (Nalco 7810) was required to provide consistent sample size and reproducible On-Line Monitor counts for the concentrate samples collected within the circuit. PTI and UK`s CAER staff will continue to research alternative column design, particularly alternative air bubble generation and air distribution systems, to try to maximize column concentrate solids content while reducing reagent dosage requirements. In addition to the KEN-FLOTE{sup TM} Column operation there were also a number of hardware problems with PTI`s On-Line Quality Monitor that must be remedied for future commercial installations.« less