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Title: ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs

Abstract

The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)
Sponsoring Org.:
DOE/ER
OSTI Identifier:
6610458
Report Number(s):
CONF-9009123-2
ON: DE90017694; TRN: 90-029458
DOE Contract Number:
W-31109-ENG-38
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Linear accelerator conference, Albuquerque, NM (USA), 9-14 Sep 1990
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
43 PARTICLE ACCELERATORS; HILACS; ION SOURCES; PERFORMANCE; BEAM EMITTANCE; DESIGN; ELECTRON CYCLOTRON-RESONANCE; ACCELERATORS; CYCLOTRON RESONANCE; HEAVY ION ACCELERATORS; LINEAR ACCELERATORS; RESONANCE 430301* -- Particle Accelerators-- Ion Sources

Citation Formats

Pardo, R.C. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs. United States: N. p., 1990. Web.
Pardo, R.C. ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs. United States.
Pardo, R.C. 1990. "ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/6610458.
@article{osti_6610458,
title = {ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) ion sources and applications with heavy-ion linacs},
author = {Pardo, R.C.},
abstractNote = {The electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source has been developed in the last few years into a reliable source of high charge-state heavy ions. The availability of heavy ions with relatively large charge-to-mass ratios (0.1--0.5) has made it possible to contemplate essentially new classes of heavy-ion linear accelerators. In this talk, I shall review the state-of-the-art in ECR source performance and describe some of the implications this performance level has for heavy-ion linear accelerator design. The present linear accelerator projects using ECR ion sources will be noted and the performance requirements of the ECR source for these projects will be reviewed. 30 refs., 3 figs.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1990,
month = 1
}

Conference:
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  • Starting with the pioneering work of R. Geller and his group in Grenoble (France), at least 14 ECR sources have been built and tested during the last five years. Most of those sources have been extremely successful, providing intense, stable and reliable beams of highly charged ions for cyclotron injection or atomic physics research. However, some of the operational features of those sources disagreed with commonly accepted theories on ECR source operation. To explain the observed behavior of actual sources, it was found necessary to refine some of the crude ideas we had about ECR sources. Some of those newmore » propositions are explained, and used to make some extrapolations on the possible future developments in ECR sources.« less
  • In the last decade ECR (Electron Cyclotron Resonance) ion sources have evolved from a single large, power consuming, complex prototype into a variety of compact, simple, reliable, efficient, high performance sources of high charge state ions for accelerators and atomic physics. The coupling of ECR sources to cyclotrons has resulted in significant performance gains in energy, intensity, reliability, and variety of ion species. Seven ECR sources are in regular operation with cyclotrons and numerous other projects are under development or in the planning stag. At least four laboratories have ECR sources dedicated for atomic physics research and other atomic physicsmore » programs share ECR sources with cyclotrons. An ECR source is now installed on the injector for the CERN SPS synchrotron to accelerate O/sup 8 +/ to relativistic energies. A project is underway at Argonne to couple an ECR source to a superconducting heavy-ion linac. Although tremendous progress has been made, the field of ECR sources is still a relatively young technology and there is still the potential for further advances both in source development and understanding of the plasma physics. The development of ECR sources is reviewed. The important physics mechanisms which come into play in the operation of ECR Sources are discussed, along with various models for charge state distributions (CSD). The design and performance of several ECR sources are compared. The 88-Inch Cyclotron and the LBL ECR is used as an example of cyclotron+ECR operation. The future of ECR sources is considered.« less
  • Electron Cyclotron Resonance (ECR) ion source technology has developed rapidly since the original pioneering work of R. Geller and his group at Grenoble in the early 1970s. These ion sources are capable of producing intense beams of highly charged positive ions and are used extensively for cyclotron injection, linac injection, and atomic physics research. In this paper, the possible use of ECR heavy-ion sources in the terminals of electrostatic machines is discussed. The basic concepts of ECR sources are reviewed in the next section using the ORNL source as a model. The possible advantages of ECR sources over conventional negativemore » ion injection and foil stripping are discussed in Section III. The last section describes the possible installation of an ECR source in a large machine such as the HHIRF 25-MV Pelletron. 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • In this study, mirror field and single coil 2.45 GHz electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) microwave plasma sources were coupled to a multipole, multicusp plasma confinement system, and used to produce chlorine plasmas for poly-Si etching. Scanning Langmuir probes were used to study the effect of process parameters on plasma potentials, plasma density, plasma density uniformity, and electron temperature, while poly-Si etching experiments on 150-mm diam wafers were used to relate process parameters and Langmuir probe results to etch rate, SiO{sub 2} selectivity, photo-resist selectivity, and etch uniformity. RF substrate bias at 13.56 MHz was used for ion energy control, andmore » the addition of a third coil below the substrate plane was found useful for fine-tuning the radial plasma uniformity. Undoped poly-Si etch rates >3000 {Angstrom}/min, Si/SiO{sub 2} etch selectivities >25, and 150-mm diam etch uniformities >2% at 1 sigma were obtained but not simultaneously. Tradeoffs in choosing operating conditions for optimum poly-Si etch performance will be discussed.« less
  • Plasmas created by microwave absorption at the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) are increasingly used for a variety of plasma processes, including both etching and deposition. ECR sources efficiently couple energy to electrons and use magnetic confinement to maximize the probability of an electron creating an ion or free radical in pressure regimes where the mean free path for ionization is comparable to the ECR source dimensions. The general operating principles of ECR sources are discussed with special emphasis on their use for thin film etching. Data on source performance during Cl base etching of Si using an ECR system aremore » presented. 32 refs., 5 figs.« less