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Title: Formation and control of trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking waters containing fulvic acid. Technical completion report

Abstract

The formation of halogenated organic compounds in drinking waters is a potentially serious environmental problem. This study examined the production of trihalomethanes by the chlorination of drinking waters containing fulvic acid and the effects of conventional water treatment processes on this phenomenon. Initially, fulvic acid was further fractionated into four subfractions by column chromatographic techniques. Chemical analysis via C-H-N-O elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to gain information on functional group content and distribution. The chlorination of fulvic acid fractions confirmed that fulvic acid compounds are significant precursors to trihalomethane formation and indicated that a number of chemical structures and functional groups is involved in the haloform reaction. The removal of fulvic acid in coagulation processes and its relationship to trihalomethane formation upon subsequent chlorination were studied in controlled experiments. Results indicated that coagulation does not uniformly remove all fulvic acid compounds. Evidence suggests that low molecular weight aromatic compounds are poorly removed by coagulation processes. In addition, studies demonstrated that the chloroform yield of fulvic acid compounds decreased significantly following coagulation.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New Hampshire Univ., Durham (USA). Water Resources Research Center
OSTI Identifier:
6605963
Report Number(s):
PB-80-200140
DOE Contract Number:  
DI-14-34-0001-8031
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DRINKING WATER; CHLORINATION; FULVIC ACIDS; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; WATER CHEMISTRY; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; CHROMATOGRAPHY; INFRARED SPECTRA; NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE; SAMPLING; WATER POLLUTION; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; HALOGENATION; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MAGNETIC RESONANCE; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; RESONANCE; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SPECTRA; WATER; 520200* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)

Citation Formats

O'Brien, D J, Bixby, R L, Jewett, M A, and Stewart, K M. Formation and control of trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking waters containing fulvic acid. Technical completion report. United States: N. p., 1980. Web.
O'Brien, D J, Bixby, R L, Jewett, M A, & Stewart, K M. Formation and control of trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking waters containing fulvic acid. Technical completion report. United States.
O'Brien, D J, Bixby, R L, Jewett, M A, and Stewart, K M. Thu . "Formation and control of trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking waters containing fulvic acid. Technical completion report". United States.
@article{osti_6605963,
title = {Formation and control of trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking waters containing fulvic acid. Technical completion report},
author = {O'Brien, D J and Bixby, R L and Jewett, M A and Stewart, K M},
abstractNote = {The formation of halogenated organic compounds in drinking waters is a potentially serious environmental problem. This study examined the production of trihalomethanes by the chlorination of drinking waters containing fulvic acid and the effects of conventional water treatment processes on this phenomenon. Initially, fulvic acid was further fractionated into four subfractions by column chromatographic techniques. Chemical analysis via C-H-N-O elemental analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy was employed to gain information on functional group content and distribution. The chlorination of fulvic acid fractions confirmed that fulvic acid compounds are significant precursors to trihalomethane formation and indicated that a number of chemical structures and functional groups is involved in the haloform reaction. The removal of fulvic acid in coagulation processes and its relationship to trihalomethane formation upon subsequent chlorination were studied in controlled experiments. Results indicated that coagulation does not uniformly remove all fulvic acid compounds. Evidence suggests that low molecular weight aromatic compounds are poorly removed by coagulation processes. In addition, studies demonstrated that the chloroform yield of fulvic acid compounds decreased significantly following coagulation.},
doi = {},
url = {https://www.osti.gov/biblio/6605963}, journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1980},
month = {5}
}

Technical Report:
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