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Title: Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis

Abstract

Detailed amino acid analysis of bones, teeth, and antler from several mammal species have shown that concentrations of several amino acids can be related to three factors: type of material analyzed, diagenetic alteration of the material, and relative age of the fossil. Concentrations of several amino acids are significantly different in enamel compared to those of dentine or cement. This can be used to check that no contamination of one material by another has occurred, which is critical for using the data for amino acid dating, since all three materials have different racemization rates for some acids. With increased in growth of secondary minerals, generally reduced amino acid concentrations are observed. Interacid ratios and concentrations vary significantly the norms expected for the type of material with increasing degrees of alteration. These effects can be linked to abnormal racemization ratios observed in the same samples. Therefore, abnormal concentrations and/or interacid ratios can be used to detect samples in which the D/L amino acid ratios otherwise appear normal, thereby insuring better accuracy of amino acid racemization analysis. For unaltered fossils, with increasing sample age regardless the type of material, some amino acids steadily degrade, while others actually increase in concentration initially duemore » to their generation as by-products of decay. Preliminary studies indicate that this progressive alteration can used to complement racemization data for determining relative stratigraphic sequences.« less

Authors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Alberta, (Canada)
OSTI Identifier:
6592738
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6592738
Report Number(s):
CONF-8510489-
Journal ID: CODEN: GAAPB
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geol. Soc. Am., Abstr. Programs; (United States); Journal Volume: 17; Conference: 98. annual meeting of the Geological Society of America, Orlando, FL, USA, 28 Oct 1985
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; AMINO ACIDS; RACEMIZATION; FOSSILS; AGE ESTIMATION; DIAGENESIS; GEOCHEMISTRY; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; MAMMALS; STEREOCHEMISTRY; ANIMALS; CARBOXYLIC ACIDS; CHEMISTRY; ORGANIC ACIDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; VERTEBRATES 580400* -- Geochemistry-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Blackwell, B., and Rutter, N.W. Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis. United States: N. p., 1985. Web.
Blackwell, B., & Rutter, N.W. Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis. United States.
Blackwell, B., and Rutter, N.W. Tue . "Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis". United States.
@article{osti_6592738,
title = {Concentration variations of amino acids in mammalian fossils: effects of diagenesis and the implications for amino acid racemization analysis},
author = {Blackwell, B. and Rutter, N.W.},
abstractNote = {Detailed amino acid analysis of bones, teeth, and antler from several mammal species have shown that concentrations of several amino acids can be related to three factors: type of material analyzed, diagenetic alteration of the material, and relative age of the fossil. Concentrations of several amino acids are significantly different in enamel compared to those of dentine or cement. This can be used to check that no contamination of one material by another has occurred, which is critical for using the data for amino acid dating, since all three materials have different racemization rates for some acids. With increased in growth of secondary minerals, generally reduced amino acid concentrations are observed. Interacid ratios and concentrations vary significantly the norms expected for the type of material with increasing degrees of alteration. These effects can be linked to abnormal racemization ratios observed in the same samples. Therefore, abnormal concentrations and/or interacid ratios can be used to detect samples in which the D/L amino acid ratios otherwise appear normal, thereby insuring better accuracy of amino acid racemization analysis. For unaltered fossils, with increasing sample age regardless the type of material, some amino acids steadily degrade, while others actually increase in concentration initially due to their generation as by-products of decay. Preliminary studies indicate that this progressive alteration can used to complement racemization data for determining relative stratigraphic sequences.},
doi = {},
journal = {Geol. Soc. Am., Abstr. Programs; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 17,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985},
month = {Tue Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 1985}
}

Conference:
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