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Title: Influence of sex and breeding condition on microhabitat selection and diet in the pig frog Rana grylio

Abstract

A 14-month study was conducted on the pig frog (Rana grylio) in SW Georgia. This species has a prolonged breeding season as males call from late March to September. Mature spermatozoa were present in the testes year-round, though seasonal testicular changes were detectable with spermatogenesis reaching a peak in June. Females contained mature ova from April through July and development of the following year's ova began in August. Stomachs of 122 postlarval specimens contained mainly anthropods. Coleoptera, Decopoda (Procambarus) and Odonata accounted for the majority of individual prey items, constituting 24.3, l9.8 and 11.9%, respectively. Intersexual dietary differences were apparent among adult frogs during the breeding season; variation in diet was strongly influenced by behavioral and habitat differences at this time.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Savannah River Ecology Lab., SC
OSTI Identifier:
6579517
DOE Contract Number:
AC09-76SR00819
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Am. Midl. Nat.; (United States); Journal Volume: 111:2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; FROGS; DIET; REPRODUCTION; ANIMAL BREEDING; ECOLOGY; HABITAT; SEX DEPENDENCE; SPERMATOGENESIS; AMPHIBIANS; ANIMALS; AQUATIC ORGANISMS; GAMETOGENESIS; VERTEBRATES 551000* -- Physiological Systems

Citation Formats

Lamb, T. Influence of sex and breeding condition on microhabitat selection and diet in the pig frog Rana grylio. United States: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.2307/2425326.
Lamb, T. Influence of sex and breeding condition on microhabitat selection and diet in the pig frog Rana grylio. United States. doi:10.2307/2425326.
Lamb, T. 1984. "Influence of sex and breeding condition on microhabitat selection and diet in the pig frog Rana grylio". United States. doi:10.2307/2425326.
@article{osti_6579517,
title = {Influence of sex and breeding condition on microhabitat selection and diet in the pig frog Rana grylio},
author = {Lamb, T.},
abstractNote = {A 14-month study was conducted on the pig frog (Rana grylio) in SW Georgia. This species has a prolonged breeding season as males call from late March to September. Mature spermatozoa were present in the testes year-round, though seasonal testicular changes were detectable with spermatogenesis reaching a peak in June. Females contained mature ova from April through July and development of the following year's ova began in August. Stomachs of 122 postlarval specimens contained mainly anthropods. Coleoptera, Decopoda (Procambarus) and Odonata accounted for the majority of individual prey items, constituting 24.3, l9.8 and 11.9%, respectively. Intersexual dietary differences were apparent among adult frogs during the breeding season; variation in diet was strongly influenced by behavioral and habitat differences at this time.},
doi = {10.2307/2425326},
journal = {Am. Midl. Nat.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 111:2,
place = {United States},
year = 1984,
month = 4
}
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