skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling

Abstract

A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulatormore » achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.« less

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Labs., TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Washington, DC (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
656856
Report Number(s):
ORNL/CP-98782; CONF-980650-
ON: DE98006063; BR: EC1206000; TRN: AHC29817%%416
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-96OR22464
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: 1998 ASHRAE summer annual meeting, Toronto (Canada), 20 Jun 1998; Other Information: PBD: [1998]
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS; ATTICS; THERMAL INSULATION; DUCTS; VENTILATION; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; TEMPERATURE MONITORING; THERMAL RADIATION

Citation Formats

Petrie, T W, Childs, P W, Christian, J E, and Wilkes, K E. Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling. United States: N. p., 1998. Web.
Petrie, T W, Childs, P W, Christian, J E, & Wilkes, K E. Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling. United States.
Petrie, T W, Childs, P W, Christian, J E, and Wilkes, K E. Wed . "Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling". United States. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/656856.
@article{osti_656856,
title = {Effect of radiant barriers and attic ventilation on residential attics and attic duct systems: New tools for measuring and modeling},
author = {Petrie, T W and Childs, P W and Christian, J E and Wilkes, K E},
abstractNote = {A simple duct system was installed in an attic test module for a large scale climate simulator at a US national laboratory. The goal of the tests and subsequent modeling was to develop an accurate method of assessing duct system performance in the laboratory, enabling limiting conditions to be imposed at will and results to be applied to residential attics with attic duct systems. Steady-state tests were done at a severe summer and a mild winter condition. In all tests the roof surface was heated above ambient air temperatures by infrared lights. The attic test module first included then did not include the duct system. Attic ventilation from eave vents to a ridge vent was varied from none to values achievable by a high level of power ventilation. A radiant barrier was attached to the underside of the roof deck, both with and without the duct system in place. Tests were also done without the radiant barrier, both with and without the duct system. When installed, the insulated ducts ran along the floor of the attic, just above the attic insulation and along the edge of the attic near the eaves and one gable. These tests in a climate simulator achieved careful control and reproducibility of conditions. This elucidated dependencies that would otherwise be hidden by variations in uncontrolled variables. Based on the comparisons with the results of the tests at the mild winter condition and the severe summer condition, model predictions for attic air and insulation temperatures should be accurate within {+-} 10 F ({+-} 6 C). This is judged adequate for design purposes and could be better when exploring the effect of changes in attic and duct parameters at fixed climatic conditions.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {1998},
month = {7}
}

Conference:
Other availability
Please see Document Availability for additional information on obtaining the full-text document. Library patrons may search WorldCat to identify libraries that hold this conference proceeding.

Save / Share: