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Title: Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow

Abstract

We report here our initial observations on the growth and morphology, and developmental radiosensitivity of giant, multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells (MN-OS) generated through in vitro cultivation of hematopoietic progenitor-enriched canine bone marrow samples. Maximum cell densities of 5.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(3) MN-OS per cm2 of growth area were achieved following 10 to 14 days of culture at 37 degrees C. Acute gamma irradiation of the initial marrow inocula resulted in significant, dose-dependent perturbations of MN-OS formation, growth, and development. Attempts to estimate radiosensitivity of MN-OS progenitors from canine marrow yielded a range of Do values from a low of 212 cGy measured at six days of culture to higher values of 405 to 542 cGy following 10 to 22 days of culture. At the intermediate times of culture (10 to 14 days), the radiation-induced responses were clearly biphasic, reflecting either (a) the presence of multiple subpopulations of MN-OS progenitors with varying degrees of radiosensitivity or (b) the inherent biphasic nature of MN-OS development involving early progenitor cell proliferation followed by maturation and subsequent fusion. Morphologically, MN-OS generated from irradiated marrow inocula appeared only marginally altered, with alterations expressed largely in a biphasic, dose-dependent fashion in terms of smallermore » cell size, reduced number of nuclei, increased expression of both surface microprojections, and a unique set of crystalloid cytoplasmic inclusions. Functionally, MN-OS appeared to be impaired by irradiation of marrow progenitors, as evidenced by failure to initiate resorptive attachments to devitalized bone spicules in vitro.« less

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab,, IL (USA)
OSTI Identifier:
6565897
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Scan. Microsc.; (United States); Journal Volume: 2:3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; BONE MARROW CELLS; RADIOSENSITIVITY; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; BONE MARROW; CELL CULTURES; CELL DIVISION; CELL PROLIFERATION; DOGS; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; GAMMA RADIATION; RADIOBIOLOGY; ANIMAL CELLS; ANIMAL TISSUES; ANIMALS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; BIOLOGY; BODY; CONNECTIVE TISSUE CELLS; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; HEMATOPOIETIC SYSTEM; IONIZING RADIATIONS; MAMMALS; ORGANS; RADIATION EFFECTS; RADIATIONS; SOMATIC CELLS; TISSUES; VERTEBRATES; 560120* - Radiation Effects on Biochemicals, Cells, & Tissue Culture

Citation Formats

Seed, T.M., Kaspar, L.V., Domann, F., Niiro, G.K., and LeBuis, D.A. Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow. United States: N. p., 1988. Web.
Seed, T.M., Kaspar, L.V., Domann, F., Niiro, G.K., & LeBuis, D.A. Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow. United States.
Seed, T.M., Kaspar, L.V., Domann, F., Niiro, G.K., and LeBuis, D.A. 1988. "Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_6565897,
title = {Developmental and radiobiologic characteristics of canine multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells generated in vitro from canine bone marrow},
author = {Seed, T.M. and Kaspar, L.V. and Domann, F. and Niiro, G.K. and LeBuis, D.A.},
abstractNote = {We report here our initial observations on the growth and morphology, and developmental radiosensitivity of giant, multinucleated, osteoclast-like cells (MN-OS) generated through in vitro cultivation of hematopoietic progenitor-enriched canine bone marrow samples. Maximum cell densities of 5.5 x 10(3) to 6.5 x 10(3) MN-OS per cm2 of growth area were achieved following 10 to 14 days of culture at 37 degrees C. Acute gamma irradiation of the initial marrow inocula resulted in significant, dose-dependent perturbations of MN-OS formation, growth, and development. Attempts to estimate radiosensitivity of MN-OS progenitors from canine marrow yielded a range of Do values from a low of 212 cGy measured at six days of culture to higher values of 405 to 542 cGy following 10 to 22 days of culture. At the intermediate times of culture (10 to 14 days), the radiation-induced responses were clearly biphasic, reflecting either (a) the presence of multiple subpopulations of MN-OS progenitors with varying degrees of radiosensitivity or (b) the inherent biphasic nature of MN-OS development involving early progenitor cell proliferation followed by maturation and subsequent fusion. Morphologically, MN-OS generated from irradiated marrow inocula appeared only marginally altered, with alterations expressed largely in a biphasic, dose-dependent fashion in terms of smaller cell size, reduced number of nuclei, increased expression of both surface microprojections, and a unique set of crystalloid cytoplasmic inclusions. Functionally, MN-OS appeared to be impaired by irradiation of marrow progenitors, as evidenced by failure to initiate resorptive attachments to devitalized bone spicules in vitro.},
doi = {},
journal = {Scan. Microsc.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 2:3,
place = {United States},
year = 1988,
month = 9
}
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