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Title: Fluorine in food with special reference to tea

Abstract

A review of the literature showed that in 1932 commercial tea, Camellia sinensis Kuntze (Thea sinensis L., Camellia thea Link.), was known to contain fluorine (F). Since ornamental camellias (C. japonica L.) and tea are members of the Theaceae family, comparisons were made of the F in leaves of the two species. The dry leaves of various domestic brands of tea, composed mostly of young leaves, contained 72 to 115 parts per million (p.p.m.) F and Chinese tea 131 to 178 p.p.m. F on a dry weight basis. One sample of fresh leaves of greenhouse grown tea plants contained 1530 p.p.m. F on a dry weight basis and the older leaves of ornamental camellias up to 3062 p.p.m. F. One sample of young leaves of C. japonica contained 67 p.p.m. F. Thus both species of Camellia have the capacity to accumulate relatively large amounts of F, especially in the older leaves. The infusion (beverage) from one tea bag in 4.5 fluid oz. of water contained 0.8 to 1.7 p.p.m. F after 3 minutes steeping and 1.0 to 2.0 p.p.m. F after 3 minutes boiling.

Authors:
; ;
OSTI Identifier:
6554208
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 6554208
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Journal Name:
Contrib. Boyce Thompson Inst.; (United States)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 19:1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; FLUORINE; BUILDUP; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; BEVERAGES; PLANTS; TEA LEAVES; TEA PLANTS; ELEMENTS; FOOD; HALOGENS; LEAVES; MASS TRANSFER; NONMETALS 510200* -- Environment, Terrestrial-- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport-- (-1989)

Citation Formats

Zimmerman, P.W., Hitchcock, A.E., and Gwirtsman, J. Fluorine in food with special reference to tea. United States: N. p., Web.
Zimmerman, P.W., Hitchcock, A.E., & Gwirtsman, J. Fluorine in food with special reference to tea. United States.
Zimmerman, P.W., Hitchcock, A.E., and Gwirtsman, J. . "Fluorine in food with special reference to tea". United States.
@article{osti_6554208,
title = {Fluorine in food with special reference to tea},
author = {Zimmerman, P.W. and Hitchcock, A.E. and Gwirtsman, J.},
abstractNote = {A review of the literature showed that in 1932 commercial tea, Camellia sinensis Kuntze (Thea sinensis L., Camellia thea Link.), was known to contain fluorine (F). Since ornamental camellias (C. japonica L.) and tea are members of the Theaceae family, comparisons were made of the F in leaves of the two species. The dry leaves of various domestic brands of tea, composed mostly of young leaves, contained 72 to 115 parts per million (p.p.m.) F and Chinese tea 131 to 178 p.p.m. F on a dry weight basis. One sample of fresh leaves of greenhouse grown tea plants contained 1530 p.p.m. F on a dry weight basis and the older leaves of ornamental camellias up to 3062 p.p.m. F. One sample of young leaves of C. japonica contained 67 p.p.m. F. Thus both species of Camellia have the capacity to accumulate relatively large amounts of F, especially in the older leaves. The infusion (beverage) from one tea bag in 4.5 fluid oz. of water contained 0.8 to 1.7 p.p.m. F after 3 minutes steeping and 1.0 to 2.0 p.p.m. F after 3 minutes boiling.},
doi = {},
journal = {Contrib. Boyce Thompson Inst.; (United States)},
number = ,
volume = 19:1,
place = {United States},
year = {},
month = {}
}